All posts by rvanderveken

Pittston Area edges Tunkhannock in 9 innings to reach District 2 Class 3A softball title game

First Posted: 10:56 pm - May 26th, 2016

By Robert Tomkavage - rtomkavage@timesleader.com



Taylor Baloga pitches against Tunkhannock. 4/19/2016 Aimee Dilger|Times Leader
Story Tools:

Social Media:

TUNKHANNOCK — Pittston Area took a two-run lead on Tunkhannock twice in the final three innings and both times the Tigers’ bats came through to keep the game going.

The lone run Pittston Area pushed across in the top of the ninth proved to be the difference as the sixth-seeded Patriots defeated Tunkhannock, 8-7, in a District 2 Class 3A semifinal game on Thursday.

Pittston Area (12-6) will play the winner of Friday’s semifinal between Abington Heights and Nanticoke for the district title on June 1.

Abbey Bradigan led off the inning with a single and was moved to second on a sacrifice bunt from Shayla Williams. The next batter, Julie Silinskie, reached base on an infield single and Lexi Felinski, a freshman, drove in Bradigan for the winning run on a sacrifice fly to center field.

Despite her youth, Pittston Area head coach Vito Quaglia was confident with Felinski in the batters box during a key moment in the game.

“She has the poise and maturity at the plate of an upperclassmen,” Quaglia said. “She swings at good pitches and goes deep into counts. She’s the spark plug to our engine.”

After both teams were scoreless over the first two innings, Felinski led off the bottom of the third with a solo home run over the fence in left-center field.

“I don’t think I’ve ever been in a game like this one,” Felinski said. “I was just trying to hit line drives and it’s amazing to get this win for the seniors.”

Second-seeded Tunkhannock (13-4) countered with three runs in the bottom of the inning on RBIs from Kendra Schultz, Jenna Simmons and Kailey Reposa.

Hope Jones started the inning with a double and pitch runner Jenn Bulford later came around to score on a sacrifice bunt from Schultz. Faith Jones singled and scored on a Simmons double.

After Tunkhannock took the 2-1 lead, Quaglia made a pitching change, with a runner on second and one out, replacing ace Taylor Baloga with Nina Cencetti.

Reposa doubled to give the Tigers a 3-1 lead, but after walking the next batter, Paige Mokychic, Cencetti retired the next two batters.

“We had a tough game yesterday against North Pocono in the heat and to come right back and pitch here against a great team, I didn’t want to put too much pressure on (Baloga),” Quaglia said of the switch. “Nina is a different type of pitcher and I knew that would give them a little bit of a different look.”

Mindina Lieback drove in Silinski, who walked to start the top of the fifth inning, with a single into right field, cutting the Patriots deficit to one run.

Pittston Area took a 5-3 lead in the top of the sixth inning after Baloga and Cencetti scored on a wild pitch and Taryn Ashby doubled to score Silinski.

With its season on the line, Tunkhannock came through with two runs, on a two-out double from Simmons to tie the game in the bottom of the seventh.

Pittston Area regained the lead in the top of the eighth when Lieback lined a double to drive in Silinskie and Felinski, who each singled.

Once again, Tunkhannock responded.

Erin Dunn, Sydney Faux and Danielle Krispen each singled to start the inning and Hope Jones followed with a ground rule double down the left field line to tie the game, 7-7.

“When they get behind, they battle back,” Tunkhannock head coach Bob Hegedty said. “They’ve been like that all year. They believe in themselves and believe they can get it done.”

Cencetti induced two consecutive pop outs to escape the jam and send the game to a ninth inning.

After Pittston Area took the lead in the top of the inning, Cencetti retired the Tunkhannock side in order to seal the win.

“She doesn’t have a conscience on the mound,” Quaglia said. “If she gives up a hit, she moves on to the next pitch and doesn’t get shaken. I can’t say enough about her effort.”

Pittston Area 8, Tunkhannock 7

Pittston Area`001`013`0`2’1—`8

Tunkhannock`003`000`2`2’0—`7

2B — PA, Taryn Ashby, Taylor Baloga, Mindina Lieback. TUNK — Hope Jones (2), Jenna Simmons, Kailey Reposa. 3B — TUNK, Reposa.

Top hitters — PA, Lieback 3-4 3 RBI; TUNK, Hope Jones 2-4 2 RBI.

Taylor Baloga pitches against Tunkhannock. 4/19/2016 Aimee Dilger|Times Leader
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_SOFTBALL-2.jpgTaylor Baloga pitches against Tunkhannock. 4/19/2016 Aimee Dilger|Times Leader

By Robert Tomkavage

rtomkavage@timesleader.com

Reach Rob Tomkavage at 570-704-3941 or on Twitter @rtomkavage.

Reach Rob Tomkavage at 570-704-3941 or on Twitter @rtomkavage.

Abington Heights routs Berwick in District 2 Class 3A softball quarterfinal game

First Posted: 1:24 pm - May 26th, 2016

By Robert Tomkavage - rtomkavage@timesleader.com



Story Tools:

Social Media:

SOUTH ABINGTON TWP. — Abington Heights’ offense was in a bit of a slump heading into the district playoffs, but the Lady Comets broke out of it in a big way Wednesday afternoon.

After being shut out by Valley View in the regular season finale, Abington Heights, the top-seed, scored four runs in the first inning en route to a 10-1 win over eighth-seeded Berwick in the quarterfinals of the District 2 Class 3A softball playoffs.

Berwick took a 1-0 lead in the top of the first, but a base running blunder prevented the potential for more runs. The Lady Bulldogs got three consecutive singles from pitcher Kylie Levan, third baseman Shea Petty and catcher Brooke Stout, and second baseman Reganne Whitmire lined a RBI single up the middle with two outs, but Petty was tagged out at third after overrunning the base to end the inning.

Third baseman Kaylee DeMatteo, left fielder Naudia Solan and first baseman Marissa Lewis each drove in a run for the Lady Comets and Cassidy Bartkowski scored on a throwing error in the bottom of the first.

“We’ve been struggling hitting in the last couple games, so it was a big confidence boost for the girls to get those runs in the first inning,” Abington Heights head coach John Kelly said. “One through nine, when we’re on, we have a pretty tough lineup.”

Center fielder Alison Kane delivered a RBI triple and pitcher Paige Harris drove in a run with a single to stretch Abington Heights’ lead to 6-1 after two innings.

DeMatteo’s RBI single in the bottom of the fourth inning, after a single from Harris, gave Abington Heights a 7-1 advantage.

“One batter got on base and there was a domino effect,” DeMatteo said. “We all pulled it together. I think it had a lot to do with our confidence.”

Berwick (7-10) threatened to cut into the deficit in the top of the fifth, but the Lady Bulldogs were unable to score.

Levan walked to lead off the inning and after Petty grounded into a fielder’s choice, Stout singled. Harris regrouped, after a brief mound visit, to strike out pinch hitter Gabi Popko and induce a pop out from Whitmire to end the threat.

“It’s amazing having a pitcher like Paige and our defense is absolutely solid to back her up,” DeMatteo said.

Kane drove in her second run of the game with a single in the bottom of the fifth to put Abington Heights ahead 8-1 and Solan provided the final blow with a two-run home run over the wall in center field.

“At the end of the year, she was our designated player and was hitting very well,” Kelly said of Solan. “We knew we had to find a spot for her in the field. We moved her from the infield to the outfield and it’s paid big dividends.”

Abington Heights (13-1) will host fourth-seeded Nanticoke (11-4) at 4:30 p.m. on Friday for a trip to the Class 3A title game on Wednesday, June 1.

http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_softball-340488_960_720-1.jpg

By Robert Tomkavage

rtomkavage@timesleader.com

Reach Robert Tomkavage at 570-704-3941 or on Twitter @rtomkavage.

Reach Robert Tomkavage at 570-704-3941 or on Twitter @rtomkavage.

H.S. Softball: Berwick falls to Abington Heights, 10-1

First Posted: 10:31 pm - May 25th, 2016

By Robert Tomkavage - rtomkavage@timesleader.com



Taylor Baloga pitches against Tunkhannock. 4/19/2016 Aimee Dilger|Times Leader
Story Tools:

Social Media:

SOUTH ABINGTON TWP. — Berwick scored first, but the Bulldogs’ inability to capitalize with runners in scoring position prevented the team from having a chance to make their fourth consecutive district title game.

Top-seed Abington Heights scored four runs in the bottom of the first inning and used a balanced offensive effort to defeat eighth-seeded Berwick, 10-1, in a District 2 Class 3A girls softball quarterfinal game on Wednesday.

Berwick (7-10) got three consecutive singles from Kylie Levan, Shea Petty and Brooke Stout in the top of the first and Reganne Whitmire lined a single up the middle with two outs to give Berwick a 1-0 lead, but Petty was tagged out at third after overrunning the base to end the inning.

Kaylee DeMatteo, Naudia Solan and Marissa Lewis each drove in a run for the Lady Comets and Cassidy Bartkowski scored on a throwing error in the bottom of the first.

“They came out with a lot of enthusiasm after we got them down,” Berwick head coach Emily Young said. “They put the ball in play and we made a couple mistakes in the field that gave them a couple extra runs.”

Alison Kane delivered a RBI triple and Paige Harris drove in a run with a single to stretch Abington Heights’ lead to 6-1 after two innings.

DeMatteo’s RBI single in the bottom of the fourth inning gave Abington Heights a 7-1 advantage.

Berwick threatened to cut into the deficit in the top of the fifth, but were unable to score.

Levan walked to lead off the inning and after a Petty grounded into a fielder’s choice, Stout singled. After a brief mound visit, Abington Heights pitcher Paige Harris regrouped to strike out pinch hitter Gabby Popko and induce a pop out from Whitmire to end the threat.

Kane drove in her second run of the game with a single in the bottom of the fifth to put Abington Heights ahead 8-1 and Solan provided the final blow with a two-run home run over the wall in center field.

Abington Heights (13-1) will host fourth-seeded Nanticoke (11-4) at 4:30 p.m. on Friday for a trip to the Class 3A title game on Wednesday, June 1.

District 3A Softball

Nanticoke 4, Valley View 3

(8 inns.)

Freshman Brinley Sobeck drove in the game-winning run in the bottom of the eighth inning with one out to send Nanticoke to the semifinals of the District 2 Class 3A Softball Tournament.

Sobeck, who finished 2 for 4 on the day, drove home Vanessa Tocket who got the inning going with a single.

Nanticoke trailed 3-1 in the bottom of the seventh with two out, but an RBI single by Miranda Bohn tied the game at 3-3.

Valley View scored three runs in the first three innings, but Tocket got Nanticoke on the board in the fifth with her solo home run.

The Cougars will travel to Abington Hts. to take on the Comets at 4:30 p.m. Friday.

Tunkhannock 2,

Wyoming Area 0

Tunkhannock made two early runs hold up as the Tigers defeated Wyoming Area in a D2-3A quarterfinal game.

Second-seeded Tunkhannock (14-3) will host No. 6 Pittston Area (11-6) at 4:30 p.m. Thursday in the semifinals.

Kendra Schultz drove home Hope Jones in the first inning for Tunkhannock’s first run. Jones added an RBI single that scored Sydney Faux in the second inning. Tunkhannock managed just four hits as it defeated Wyoming Area for the third time this season.

Jones was dominant in the circle, striking out 13 and limiting the Warriors (9-7) to for hits.

Pittston Area 3, North Pocono 0

Taylor Baloga pitched her second shutout of the tournament as No. 6 Pittston Area eliminated No. 3 North Pocono.

Baloga struck out five and scattered three hits, all doubles.

Pittston Area (11-6) will play at No. 2 Tunkhannock (14-3) at 4:30 p.m. Thursday in the semifinals due to Pittston Area’s prom on Friday.

Baloga and Abbey Bradigan had their hands in all the Pittston Area runs.

In the second, Baloga singled and scored on Bradigan’s double. Bradigan later scored on a passed ball for a 2-0 lead.

Taylor scored in the sixth on Bradigan’s groundout.

***

District 2 Class 3A quarterfinals

Abington Heights 10, Berwick 1

Berwick`AB`R`H`BI

Starr ss`4`0`0`0

Levan p`4`1`1`0

Petty 3b`4`0`2`0

Stout c`4`0`3`0

Stoker dh`2`0`0`0

Popko dh`2`0`0`0

Whitmire 2b`4`0`1`1

Pinterich rf`3`0`2`0

Fries 1b`3`0`0`0

Zalutko cf`1`0`0`0

Bowes cf`2`0`0`0

Totals`33`1`9`1

Abington`AB`R`H`BI

Bartkowski ss`4`0`0`0

Kane cf`4`0`2`2

Harris p`4`0`2`1

Emmett c`4`0`1`0

DeMatteo 3b`4`0`2`2

Solan lf`4`1`3`3

Lewis 1b`4`1`2`1

Kozar dh`4`0`1`0

Toth 2b`3`0`1`0

Brown ph`1`0`0`0

McGinley rf 1`0`0`0

Totals`36`10`14`9

Berwick`100`000`0`—`1

Abington`420`112`X`—`10

2B — DeMatteo, Solan, Lewis, Kozar. 3B — Kane. HR —Solan

Berwick`IP`H`R`ER`BB`K

Levan (L)`6.0`14`10`9`3`2

Abington`IP`H`R`ER`BB`K

Harris (W)`7`9`1`1`3`7

Tunkhannock 2, Wyoming Area 0

Wyo Area`AB`R`H`BI

Bednarski`2`0`1`0

Remley`4`0`1`0

Skok`2`0`1`0

Glatz`3`0`1`0

Coolbaugh`2`0`0`0

Nametko`3`0`0`0

GGober`2`0`0`0

Karcutskie`1`0`0`0

Parente`3`0`0`0

Kopetchney`3`0`0`0

Totals`25`0`4`0

Tunk`AB`R`H`BI

HJones`3`1`2`1

FJones`1`0`0`0

Schultz`2`0`0`1

Simmons`3`0`1`0

Reposa`3`0`0`0

Mokychic`3`0`0`0

Traver`2`0`0`0

Dunn`0`0`0`0

Faux`3`1`1`0

Krispin`2`0`0`0

Totals`22`2`4`2

Wyoming Area`000`000`0`—`0

Tunkhannock`110`000`x`—`2

2B – Remley, Jones, Faux.

Wyo Area`IP`H`R`ER`BB`SO

Glatz (L)`6.0`4`2`2`2`2

Tunk`IP`H`R`ER`BB`SO

HJones (W)`7.0`4`0`0`3`13

Nanticoke 4, Valley View 3

(8 inn.)

Valley View`201`000`00`—`3

Nanticoke`000`010`21`—`4

Pitching — WP, Miranda Bohn 3 IP, 1 H, 0 R, 0 ER, 1 BB, 1 SO; Leandra Ramos 5 IP, 8 H, 3 R, 0 ER, 0 BB, 2 SO; LP, Holly Young 7 IP, 8 H, 4 R, 4 ER, 3 BB, 0 SO.

2B — NAN, Jenna Lipowski; NAN, Morgan Briggs. HR — NAN, Tocket.

Top hitters — NAN, Lipowski 1-4, 2B; Briggs 1-4, 2B; Bohn 1-3 RBI single; Brinley Sobeck 2-4, RBI single; Tocket HR; VAL, Clare Sebastianelli 3-4, 3 singles.

Pittston Area 3, North Pocono 0

Pittston Area`020`001`0`—`3

North Pocono`000`000`0`—`0

Pitching — WP, Taylor Baloga 7 IP, 3 H, 0 R 0 ER, 0 BB, 5 SO; LP — Alex Thomas 7 IP, 6 H, 3 R, 2 ER, 2 BB, 2 SO.

2B — PA, Abbey Bradigan; NP, Casey Carpenter, Mariah Casey, Abby Haddock.

Top hitters — PA, Baloga 2-4, Taryn Ashby 1-3, Alexa McHugh 1-3, Bradigan 1-3, 2 RBI; Julie Silinskie 1-3.

Taylor Baloga pitches against Tunkhannock. 4/19/2016 Aimee Dilger|Times Leader
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_SOFTBALL-1.jpgTaylor Baloga pitches against Tunkhannock. 4/19/2016 Aimee Dilger|Times Leader

By Robert Tomkavage

rtomkavage@timesleader.com

Reach Times Leader sports at 570-829-7143 or on Twitter @tlsports.

Reach Times Leader sports at 570-829-7143 or on Twitter @tlsports.

Lackawanna State Park dedicates new pool complex to the late Pennsylvania Governor William W. Scranton

First Posted: 8:55 pm - May 25th, 2016

By Elizabeth Baumeister - ebaumeister@timesleader.com



A panoramic view of the new pool complex at the Lackawanna State Park.
Elizabeth Baumeister photos | Abington Journal
Koflanovich
Elizabeth Baumeister photos | Abington Journal
Dunn
Elizabeth Baumeister photos | Abington Journal
Scranton
Elizabeth Baumeister photos | Abington Journal
Blake
Elizabeth Baumeister photos | Abington Journal
Baker
Elizabeth Baumeister photos | Abington Journal
Kern
Elizabeth Baumeister photos | Abington Journal
The new pool complex at the Lackawanna State Park features a splash pad play area with various spray elements.
Elizabeth Baumeister photos | Abington Journal
Story Tools:

More Info:

More info

The William W. Scranton Pool Complex at the Lackawanna State Park, North Abington Road, North Abington Twp., will open at 11 a.m. Saturday. Official daily hours are from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Wntrance fee is $5 per person, with discounted rates available for groups and campers.

For more information, visit bit.ly/1XuH3nh or call the park office at 570-945-3239.

Social Media:

NORTH ABINGTON TWP. — The weekend weather looks good for Lackawanna County residents who have waited a a year and a half to swim in the new pool at Lackawanna State Park on North Abington Road.

The William W. Scranton Pool Complex will officially open to the public at 11 a.m. Saturday. According to Park Manager Kevin Koflanovich, hours may vary until the complex is fully staffed, but official hours are from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily. The entrance fee is $5 per person, with discounted rates available for groups and campers.

A dedication ceremony was held Tuesday with Koflanovich serving as master of ceremonies. Speakers included DCNR Secretary Cindy Dunn, former Lieutenant Governor William Scranton III, Senator John Blake, Senator Lisa Baker and William Kern, of Countryside Conservancy.

“We wanted to pick a day to open this pool that would generate interest in the state parks,” Dunn said during her remarks. “This weekend launches our summer season. And the three big holiday weekends of the summer are when many of our 38 million visitors to state parks come. These 38 million visitors drive a lot of local economy. In fact, we see about a billion dollars to our state’s economy from the 38 million visitors each year, and it supports about 13,000 local jobs.”

Named in memory of the late Pennsylvania governor whose former home is located a couple miles from the park, the new complex features a 203,000 gallon pool, a splash pad play area with various sprinklers, shower buildings, a food concession area and a lifeguard and first aid building. The pool depth starts at one foot in the shallow end and gradually deepens to five feet. In addition to traditional ladders, it is accessible via ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) ramps.

“This is a day my father would have just loved. …He’d be out in this park,” said William Scranton III, to which an audience member replied, “He would have walked over.”

Scranton agreed.

“He and my mother would have been here,” he said. “My father was an inveterate user of this park.”

The new complex, $4.5 million project was funded through Enhance Penn’s Woods, a two-year, $200 million state initiative to repair and update Pennsylvania parks and forests. It replaces the original swimming pool that opened along with the park in 1972.

A panoramic view of the new pool complex at the Lackawanna State Park.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_ABJ-Lack-Pool-2-2.jpgA panoramic view of the new pool complex at the Lackawanna State Park. Elizabeth Baumeister photos | Abington Journal

Koflanovich
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_ABJ-Lack-Pool-3-2.jpgKoflanovich Elizabeth Baumeister photos | Abington Journal

Dunn
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_ABJ-Lack-Pool-4-2.jpgDunn Elizabeth Baumeister photos | Abington Journal

Scranton
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_ABJ-Lack-Pool-5-2.jpgScranton Elizabeth Baumeister photos | Abington Journal

Blake
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_ABJ-Lack-Pool-6-2.jpgBlake Elizabeth Baumeister photos | Abington Journal

Baker
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_ABJ-Lack-Pool-7-2.jpgBaker Elizabeth Baumeister photos | Abington Journal

Kern
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_ABJ-Lack-Pool-8-2.jpgKern Elizabeth Baumeister photos | Abington Journal

The new pool complex at the Lackawanna State Park features a splash pad play area with various spray elements.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_ABJ-Lack-Pool-1-2.jpgThe new pool complex at the Lackawanna State Park features a splash pad play area with various spray elements. Elizabeth Baumeister photos | Abington Journal

By Elizabeth Baumeister

ebaumeister@timesleader.com

More info

The William W. Scranton Pool Complex at the Lackawanna State Park, North Abington Road, North Abington Twp., will open at 11 a.m. Saturday. Official daily hours are from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Wntrance fee is $5 per person, with discounted rates available for groups and campers.

For more information, visit bit.ly/1XuH3nh or call the park office at 570-945-3239.

Reach Elizabeth Baumeister at 570-704-3943 or on Twitter @AbingtonJournal.

Reach Elizabeth Baumeister at 570-704-3943 or on Twitter @AbingtonJournal.

Lackawanna State Park dedicates new pool complex to the late Pennsylvania Governor William W. Scranton

First Posted: 1:50 pm - May 25th, 2016 Updated: 1:55 pm - May 25th, 2016.

By Elizabeth Baumeister - ebaumeister@timesleader.com



The new pool complex at the Lackawanna State Park features a splash pad play area with various spray elements.
Elizabeth Baumeister photos | Abington Journal
A panoramic view of the new pool complex at the Lackawanna State Park.
Elizabeth Baumeister photos | Abington Journal
Koflanovich
Elizabeth Baumeister photos | Abington Journal
Dunn
Elizabeth Baumeister photos | Abington Journal
Scranton
Elizabeth Baumeister photos | Abington Journal
Blake
Elizabeth Baumeister photos | Abington Journal
Baker
Elizabeth Baumeister photos | Abington Journal
Kern
Elizabeth Baumeister photos | Abington Journal
Video:

Source: Elizabeth Baumeister | Abington Journal

Lackawanna State Park dedicates its new pool complex to the late Pennsylvania Governor William W. Scranton
Story Tools:

More Info:

More info

The William W. Scranton Pool Complex at the Lackawanna State Park will open at 11 a.m. Saturday, May 28. Official daily hours are from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. The entrance fee is $5 per person, with discounted rates available for groups and campers.

For more information, visit bit.ly/1XuH3nh or call the park office at 570-945-3239.

Social Media:

NORTH ABINGTON TWP. — After a year and a half of waiting, Lackawanna County residents and visitors will have the opportunity to go for a swim this weekend in the Lackawanna State Park’s new swimming pool.

The William W. Scranton Pool Complex will officially open to the public at 11 a.m. Saturday, May 28. According to Park Manager Kevin Koflanovich, hours may vary until the complex is fully staffed, but the official hours are from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., daily. The entrance fee is $5 per person, with discounted rates available for groups and campers.

A dedication ceremony was held Tuesday afternoon, May 24. Koflanovich served as MC and speakers included DCNR Secretary Cindy Dunn, former Lieutenant Governor William Scranton III, Senator John Blake, Senator Lisa Baker and William Kern, of Countryside Conservancy.

“We wanted to pick a day to open this pool that would generate interest in the state parks,” Dunn said during her remarks. “This weekend launches our summer season. And the three big holiday weekends of the summer are when many of our 38 million visitors to state parks come. These 38 million visitors drive a lot of local economy. In fact, we see about a billion dollars to our state’s economy from the 38 million visitors each year, and it supports about 13,000 local jobs.”

Named in memory of the late Pennsylvania governor, whose former home is located a couple miles from the park, the new complex features a 203,000 gallon pool, a splash pad play area with various sprinklers, shower buildings, a food concession area and a lifeguard and first aid building. The pool depth starts at one foot in the shallow end and gradually deepens to five feet. In addition to traditional ladders, it is accessible via ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) ramps.

“This is a day my father would have just loved. …He’d be out in this park,” said William Scranton III, to which an audience member replied, “He would have walked over.”

Scranton agreed.

“He would have walked over. He and my mother would have been here. My father was an inveterate user of this park.”

The new complex, $4.5 million project was funded through Enhance Penn’s Woods, a two-year, $200 million state initiative to repair and update Pennsylvania parks and forests. It replaces the original swimming pool that opened along with the park in 1972.

The new pool complex at the Lackawanna State Park features a splash pad play area with various spray elements.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_ABJ-Lack-Pool-1-1.jpgThe new pool complex at the Lackawanna State Park features a splash pad play area with various spray elements. Elizabeth Baumeister photos | Abington Journal

A panoramic view of the new pool complex at the Lackawanna State Park.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_ABJ-Lack-Pool-2-1.jpgA panoramic view of the new pool complex at the Lackawanna State Park. Elizabeth Baumeister photos | Abington Journal

Koflanovich
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_ABJ-Lack-Pool-3-1.jpgKoflanovich Elizabeth Baumeister photos | Abington Journal

Dunn
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_ABJ-Lack-Pool-4-1.jpgDunn Elizabeth Baumeister photos | Abington Journal

Scranton
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_ABJ-Lack-Pool-5-1.jpgScranton Elizabeth Baumeister photos | Abington Journal

Blake
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_ABJ-Lack-Pool-6-1.jpgBlake Elizabeth Baumeister photos | Abington Journal

Baker
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_ABJ-Lack-Pool-7-1.jpgBaker Elizabeth Baumeister photos | Abington Journal

Kern
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_ABJ-Lack-Pool-8-1.jpgKern Elizabeth Baumeister photos | Abington Journal

By Elizabeth Baumeister

ebaumeister@timesleader.com

More info

The William W. Scranton Pool Complex at the Lackawanna State Park will open at 11 a.m. Saturday, May 28. Official daily hours are from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. The entrance fee is $5 per person, with discounted rates available for groups and campers.

For more information, visit bit.ly/1XuH3nh or call the park office at 570-945-3239.

Reach Elizabeth Baumeister at 570-704-3943 or on Twitter @AbingtonJournal.


VideoID: 6e5e901ff513b883b562f34fa8898416258e73c7
VideoType: BIMVID
URL: http://cdn.field59.com/HEARTLAND/6e5e901ff513b883b562f34fa8898416258e73c7_fl9-360p.mp4
Video Embed String: <script src=’http://player.field59.com/v3/vp/heartland/6e5e901ff513b883b562f34fa8898416258e73c7’></script>
Video Caption: Lackawanna State Park dedicates its new pool complex to the late Pennsylvania Governor William W. Scranton
Video Credit: Elizabeth Baumeister | Abington Journal
Video Position:

(use the “for files…” link above to associate attached files with this source)

Reach Elizabeth Baumeister at 570-704-3943 or on Twitter @AbingtonJournal.

Josh Kopcza, Wyoming Area blank three-time champ Abington Heights

First Posted: 10:02 pm - May 24th, 2016

By John Erzar - jerzar@timesleader.com



5/16/16. Sean McKeag | Times Leader
Story Tools:

Social Media:

WEST PITTSTON — When a team even scores on a bases-loaded catcher’s interfere, things are certainly going good.

Things went better than good for Wyoming Area on Tuesday against three-time defending District 2 Class 3A champion Abington Heights.

Josh Kopcza pitched a much-needed complete game and second baseman Tyler Dougherty turned in a unique unassisted double play as the Warriors rolled into the semifinals with a 7-0 victory.

Second-seeded Wyoming Area (11-2) advanced to the district semifinals for the sixth time under coach Ron Musto, who has coached the team a total of 16 years in two stints. The Warriors lost all five previous semifinals by one run at home. They host third-seeded North Pocono (7-6) at 4:30 p.m. Thursday.

Seventh-seeded Abington (6-8) saw its streak of 12 consecutive D2-3A victories end. The Comets’ last loss in the district playoffs came in 2012 when they fell 10-0 to Tunkhannock in the opening round.

“These guys played hard. I love them,” Abington coach Bill Zalewski said. “I don’t think anything was different (this season). We just got in a little bit of a funk and didn’t make some plays and that comes back to haunt you a little bit. But I’m proud of them because the one thing I know is they leave it on the field.”

Kopcza entered the game with an 0.66 ERA and 45 strikeouts in 42.1 innings in Wyoming Valley Conference games. He had five strikeouts Tuesday and was in a bit of trouble at times, but worked out of it and kept the remaining pitchers fresh for Thursday.

“With the short week, it was big,” Musto said. “We took care of his arm all year. We kept him around 100 pitches all year and today we were going to push him to 120, 125. He was either going to have the week off or the summer off. He threw well and that’s what we needed out him.

“Against a quality team like Abington, you have to play good defense and you have to get good pitching, and that’s what we got today.”

Defense came to the forefront in the fifth inning. Sam Arnold and Luke Fayocavitz opened the inning with singles, putting Comets on first and second. Expecting a bunt, Musto had Dougherty aligned closer to second base. Instead, Ryan Harvey swung away and ripped a low liner up the middle. Dougherty made a diving catch and belly-flopped on second all in one motion for a double play.

“Besides being the most insane play I’ve ever seen, it was huge,” Kopcza said. “It was definitely a web gem.”

Wyoming Area took a 2-0 lead in the third. The Warriors loaded the bases when Steve Homza reached on an error on his sacrifice bunt, Mike Bonita got aboard on a fielder’s choice and Cory Lescavage walked. Kopcza then hit a foul ball toward the parking lot on the right-field line. The fans that looked to see if all vehicles would be spared turned back to the field to see Kopcza trotting to first. The umpire ruled the catcher interfered with the swing.

Brandon Charney made it 2-0 with a deep sacrifice fly to right.

Abington pitcher Colin McCreary, pitching in only his second game of the season due to an arm injury suffered last summer, got in trouble again in the fifth. He appeared out of it when Bonita hit a routine grounder with two outs, but the ball was booted and Ryan Webb scored. Lescavage added an RBI single to make it 4-0.

Aaron Lee added an RBI single in the fifth and Kopcza did the same in the sixth.

NOTES: Abington had its lead-off batter on base in the second, fourth, fifth and sixth innings. … Abington second baseman Zach Spangenberg is the brother of San Diego Padres second baseman Cory Spangenberg. … Kopcza held the Comets to 1 for 10 with runners in scoring position.

Crestwood 3, Berwick 1

James Graves went the distance on the mound to lift the fifth-seeded Comets to a win in the Class 3A quarterfinals.

Brett Caladie finished 2 for 3 with an RBI while Brandon Brozena added two hits and Tim Kindler knocked in a run of his own. Matt Champ gave No. 4 Berwick a 1-0 lead in the third. Max Melito doubled for the Bulldogs.

Valley View 15,

Pittston Area 0

Top-seeded Valley View made quick work of the No. 8 Patriots, ending the Class 3A quarterfinal matchup in three innings.

The Cougars will host Crestwood in Thursday’s semifinals with a trip to PNC Field on the line.

District 2 Class 3A quarterfinals

Wyoming Area 7, Abington Heights 0

Abington`AB`R`H`BI

Fayocavitz rf`4`0`1`0

Harvey ss`4`0`0`0

Spangenberg 2b`3`0`1`0

Myers c`1`0`1`0

Hughes 1b`3`0`0`0

Duboski lf`3`0`1`0

McCreary p`2`0`0`0

Carlini dh`3`0`0`0

Rothenbrgr cf`0`0`0`0

Swank p`0`0`0`0

Eckersley p`0`0`0`0

Arnold 3b`2`0`2`0

Totals`25`0`6`0

Wyo Area`AB`R`H`BI

Bonita cf`3`2`0`0

Lescavage ss`3`0`2`1

Kopcza p`2`1`1`2

Charney 3b`2`0`1`1

Dougherty 2b`3`0`0`0

Minichello dh`4`0`0`0

Nardell lf`0`0`0`0

Webb rf`2`2`0`0

Lee c`3`0`2`1

Homza 1b`2`2`1`0

Totals`24`7`7`5

Abington Hts.`000`000`0`—`0

Wyoming Area`002`212`x`—`7

E — Abington 4. DP — Abington 1, Wyoming Area 2. LOB — Abington 8, Wyoming Area 8. 2B — Duboski. SB — Carlini, Webb, Bonita. SAC — Dougherty, Homza. SF — Charney.

Abington`IP`H`R`ER`BB`SO

McCreary (L)`4.0`4`4`0`2`4

Swank`1.0`1`1`0`0`1

Eckersley`0.0`2`2`2`1`0

Harvey`1.0`0`0`0`1`0

Wyo Area`IP`H`R`ER`BB`SO

Kopcza (W)`7.0`6`0`0`2`5

District 2 Class 3A quarterfinals

Crestwood 3, Berwick 1

Crestwood`AB`R`H`BI

Distasio ss`2`0`0`0

Kovalchik 3b`1`0`0`0

Chalk 1b`4`0`0`0

Graves p`4`0`1`0

Darden c-2b`0`0`0`0

Macko dh`2`0`0`0

Brozena dh`2`1`2`0

TKindler lf`4`0`1`1

Kresge cf`3`1`1`0

Albee rf`3`1`0`0

Tokach 3b-c`3`0`0`0

Caladie 2b-ss`3`0`2`1

Totals`31`3`7`2

Berwick`AB`R`H`BI

Melito rf`4`0`1`0

Horsefld 1b-p`3`1`1`0

Curtin 3b`2`0`1`0

Marshman p`3`0`1`0

Champ cf`2`0`0`1

Knorr c`0`0`0`0

Novicki dh`3`0`1`0

Laubach 2b`3`0`0`0

AlMarkle ss`3`0`1`0

Mensinger lf`2`0`0`0

DiValerio ph`1`0`1`0

Totals`26`1`7`1

Crestwood`000`210`0`—`3

Berwick`001`000`0`—`1

2B — Graves, Melito

Crestwood`IP`H`R`ER`BB`K

Graves (W)`7.0`7`1`1`1`2

Berwick`IP`H`R`ER`BB`K

Mrshmn (L)`6.2`7`3`1`0`8

Horsefield`0.1`0`0`0`0`0

5/16/16. Sean McKeag | Times Leader
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_HatBat-1.jpg5/16/16. Sean McKeag | Times Leader

By John Erzar

jerzar@timesleader.com

Reach John Erzar at 570-991-6394 or on Twitter @TLJohnErzar

Reach John Erzar at 570-991-6394 or on Twitter @TLJohnErzar

Abington Heights High School’s first principal Michael Dziak Jr. shares memories in light of upcoming 50th anniversary celebration

First Posted: 7:21 pm - May 24th, 2016

By Elizabeth Baumeister - ebaumeister@timesleader.com



Michael Dziak, Jr. was the first principal of the new Abington Heights High School. He started his career in the district in 1951 as a biology and American history teacher at the Clarks Summit-Abington High School on Grove Street. During his second year there, he was appointed athletic director, and after five years, he became part time assistant principal. He was appointed principal about 10 years later. Photo from 1967.
Abington Journal file photos
William Crum served as the new Abington Heights High School’s first Superintendent. When he was promoted from the role of principal, Michael Dziak, his assistant principal stepped up to fill that role. Photo from 1967.
Abington Journal file photos
When the Abington Heights High School building opened in the fall of 1967, it was equipped with the latest technology and this language laboratory was no exception.
Abington Journal file photos
A 1967 nighttime photo from the Journal archives shows the contrast of the then-new building lit up against a dark sky.
Abington Journal file photos
Video:

Source: Elizabeth Baumeister | Abington Journal

Abington Heights High School is celebrating the 50th anniversary of the construction of its building on Noble Road, with a weekend of activities slated for May 27 and 28. To commemorate the event, we put together this photo slideshow of images from our archives, showing the school’s first few years.
Story Tools:

More Info:

WEEKEND SCHEDULE

Friday, May 27

1:45 to 3:15 p.m: Oral history presentation in the auditorium, followed by a re-dedication ceremony in the main gym. For current high school students, faculty and staff, former AH educators and administrators, school board members and community leaders.

7 to 8 p.m: Choir concert in the auditorium, art show in the auxiliary gym and memorabilia display in the library. Open to the public.

Saturday, May 28

All Saturday activities are open to the public.

9 to 11 a.m: Open house. Students will be available to give tours of the building and the library will open for a memorabilia display and gallery walk, along with coffee and light refreshments.

10 to 10:30 a.m: Oral history presentation in the auditorium.

For more information, visit ahsd50.org.

Social Media:

FALLS TWP. — The Abington Heights High School 50th anniversary celebration coming up this weekend at the campus on Noble Road in South Abington Township has Michael Dziak Jr., 89, reflecting on memories from half a century ago.

“It was an enjoyable experience,” said the school’s first principal. “If I had another chance, I would do the same thing that I did.”

The Falls Township native lived on a farm for the first 18 years of his life, until he was drafted for World War II. After two years of service in the army, he received an honorable discharge and went on to pursue a higher education. He graduated from East Stroudsburg State College (now East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania), earning a Bachelor of Science degree with certification in biology, American history and geography. He later earned his master’s degree from the University of Colorado in Boulder.

Dziak began his career in education with a short stint at the Honesdale High School, teaching biology and chemistry, although he was not certified in the latter. When a position opened up in 1951 at the Clarks Summit – Abington High School (a then-recent merger between the Clarks Summit-Clarks Green school and the Waverly school), he jumped at the opportunity.

He started in the district in 1951 as a biology and American history teacher. During his second year there, he was appointed athletic director, and after five years, part-time assistant principal under Principal William Crum. After about 10 years as assistant principal, Dziak replaced Crum, when the principal was promoted to the superintendent position. At that time John Franklin was appointed assistant principal. Dziak retired 1984.

Some of Dziak’s fondest memories from working at Abington Heights come from his involvement in presenting the Comets Revues, biannual variety shows to help raise money for athletic awards. Another aspect which brings good memories is his work with the faculty-student council.

He said one of the biggest challenges of the job came in the form of discipline. Smoking was a problem, with students often lighting up cigarettes in the bathrooms.

Playing hooky also seemed to be a hobby for some students, but Dziak had his own way of dealing with that.

“I used to go out and check if students skipped school, particularly at lunch time,” he said. “They went up to a restaurant. …As I pulled up, I could see students sitting at the counter. When I went in, they had disappeared. Now they’ve got to be somewhere. Kitchen? No. Boys’ bathroom? No. Girls’ bathroom? Yes.”

Back to school with Mr. Dziak the students then went, earning themselves detention.

Although ongoing health issues prevent him from attending all of the anniversary weekend activities, Dziak said he hopes to be there for Saturday’s open house and looks forward to chatting with former students and faculty. He added much credit is due the school’s current assistant principal, Lee Ann Theony, for organizing the celebration.

Friday’s events will begin with a re-dedication ceremony and history presentation from 1:45 to 3:15 p.m., open to current students, faculty and staff; former educators and administrators; school board members and community leaders. The public is invited to join in the celebration that evening with a choir concert, art show and memorabilia display, from 7 to 8 p.m.

Saturday’s events, open to the public, includes an open house from 9 to 11 a.m., with an oral history presentation from 10 to 10:30 a.m.

Michael Dziak, Jr. was the first principal of the new Abington Heights High School. He started his career in the district in 1951 as a biology and American history teacher at the Clarks Summit-Abington High School on Grove Street. During his second year there, he was appointed athletic director, and after five years, he became part time assistant principal. He was appointed principal about 10 years later. Photo from 1967.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_ABJ-AHHS-Dziak.jpgMichael Dziak, Jr. was the first principal of the new Abington Heights High School. He started his career in the district in 1951 as a biology and American history teacher at the Clarks Summit-Abington High School on Grove Street. During his second year there, he was appointed athletic director, and after five years, he became part time assistant principal. He was appointed principal about 10 years later. Photo from 1967. Abington Journal file photos

William Crum served as the new Abington Heights High School’s first Superintendent. When he was promoted from the role of principal, Michael Dziak, his assistant principal stepped up to fill that role. Photo from 1967.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_ABJ-AHHS-Crum.jpgWilliam Crum served as the new Abington Heights High School’s first Superintendent. When he was promoted from the role of principal, Michael Dziak, his assistant principal stepped up to fill that role. Photo from 1967. Abington Journal file photos

When the Abington Heights High School building opened in the fall of 1967, it was equipped with the latest technology and this language laboratory was no exception.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_ABJ-AHHS-section-4.jpgWhen the Abington Heights High School building opened in the fall of 1967, it was equipped with the latest technology and this language laboratory was no exception. Abington Journal file photos

A 1967 nighttime photo from the Journal archives shows the contrast of the then-new building lit up against a dark sky.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_ABJ-AHHS-0101667.jpgA 1967 nighttime photo from the Journal archives shows the contrast of the then-new building lit up against a dark sky. Abington Journal file photos

By Elizabeth Baumeister

ebaumeister@timesleader.com

WEEKEND SCHEDULE

Friday, May 27

1:45 to 3:15 p.m: Oral history presentation in the auditorium, followed by a re-dedication ceremony in the main gym. For current high school students, faculty and staff, former AH educators and administrators, school board members and community leaders.

7 to 8 p.m: Choir concert in the auditorium, art show in the auxiliary gym and memorabilia display in the library. Open to the public.

Saturday, May 28

All Saturday activities are open to the public.

9 to 11 a.m: Open house. Students will be available to give tours of the building and the library will open for a memorabilia display and gallery walk, along with coffee and light refreshments.

10 to 10:30 a.m: Oral history presentation in the auditorium.

For more information, visit ahsd50.org.

Reach Elizabeth Baumeister at 570-704-3943 or on Twitter @AbingtonJournal.


VideoID: 208d3f62a544082eac42af18afa689cd449d892e
VideoType: BIMVID
URL: http://player.field59.com/v3/vp/heartland/208d3f62a544082eac42af18afa689cd449d892e
Video Embed String: <script src=’http://player.field59.com/v3/vp/heartland/208d3f62a544082eac42af18afa689cd449d892e’></script>
Video Caption: Abington Heights High School is celebrating the 50th anniversary of the construction of its building on Noble Road, with a weekend of activities slated for May 27 and 28. To commemorate the event, we put together this photo slideshow of images from our archives, showing the school’s first few years.
Video Credit: Elizabeth Baumeister | Abington Journal
Video Position:

(use the “for files…” link above to associate attached files with this source)

Reach Elizabeth Baumeister at 570-704-3943 or on Twitter @AbingtonJournal.

Clarks Green awarded grant to repair borough’s traffic light

First Posted: 7:12 pm - May 24th, 2016

By Elizabeth Baumeister - ebaumeister@timesleader.com



Story Tools:

Social Media:

CLARKS GREEN — The following items were discussed at the May 18 council meeting:

• Resident and former council member Maureen Palmer expressed concerns regarding the traffic light at the intersection of Grove Street and North Abington Road and the need for repairs. Council also announced the borough just received word that a grant will be awarded for this purpose.

• Mike Williamson and Bill Kern, of the Countryside Conservancy gave a presentation on the organization, requesting the borough consider making a donation.

• Council discussed options regarding regular maintenance of the borough’s clock, located across the street from the municipal building. The board decided to pay to have regular maintenance work done every other year.

• The police report and fire report were presented, along with various committee reports.

The next regular meeting is scheduled for 7 p.m. Wednesday, June 15, with a work session at 7 p.m. Wednesday, June 1. Meetings are held at the municipal building, located at 104 North Abington Road.

http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_ABJ-meetings.jpg

By Elizabeth Baumeister

ebaumeister@timesleader.com

Reach Elizabeth Baumeister at 570-704-3943 or on Twitter @AbingtonJournal

Reach Elizabeth Baumeister at 570-704-3943 or on Twitter @AbingtonJournal

Arts and entertainment calendar for week of May 25, 2016

First Posted: 6:38 pm - May 24th, 2016 Updated: 6:38 pm - May 24th, 2016.

Story Tools:

Social Media:

VISUAL ARTS/PERFORMING ARTS

Marywood University Graduate MFA Exhibition, through June 3 in the Mahady Gallery on campus. Features Masters of Fine Arts thesis work of Annmarie Holler in painting and Eva Polizzi in ceramics combining fibers. A reception will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. May 7. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. Info: 570-348-6278, gallery@marywood.edu or marywood.edu/galleries.

Actors Circle presents ‘Doctor Cook’s Garden’ by Ira Levin, May 26 through 29 and June 2 through 5 at Providence Playhouse, 1256 Providence Road, Scranton. Thursday, Friday and Saturday performances begin at 8 p.m. and Sunday performances at 2 p.m. Cost: $12 general, $10 seniors and $8 students; May 26 tickets are discounted at $8 General and seniors and $6 students. Reservations: 570-342-9707. Info: visit Actors Circle Facebook page or actorscircle.org.

‘As You Like It’ National Theatre Live on Screen, 2 p.m. May 27 at the Dietrich Theater. Cost: $14 for general admission, $12 for member/senior tickets and $10 for child/student and group tickets (group minimum is 10 people). Info/reservations: 570-996-1500.

Open Mic Night with Corky Staats, 7 p.m. May 27 at the Dietrich Theater. Doors open for sign ups at 6:30 p.m. Open to audiences and performers of all ages. Cost: free. Info: 570-996-1500.

The NEPA Bluegrass Festival, June 2 to 5 at Lazy Brook Park in Tunkhannock. More than a dozen traditional and progressive bluegrass bands will be featured on two stages. Headliners this year include Marty Raybon and Full Circle, the Spinney Brothers and Nothin’ Fancy. Other activities include a “sip and paint” class on Friday afternoon, a Kids Corner from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, instrument repairs and restringing and more. Tickets/info: nepabluegrass.com.

Ghostlight Productions’ Eighth Annual Shakespeare in the Park: ‘Julius Caesar,’ 6:30 p.m. Fridays, June 3 and 10 and Saturdays, June 4 and 11 and 2:30 p.m. Sundays, June 5 and 12 at South Abington Park. Cost: free; donations accepted. Info: ghostlightNEPA.com, rlstrayerwrites@gmail.com or 570-575-5185.

The Carmel Ardito School of Dance presents ‘Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow,’ 7:30 p.m. June 3 at the Scranton Cultural Center. Tickets may be purchased at the door one hour prior to show time, at the studio, or from participating dancers. Cost: $13 general and $16 reserved. Info: 570-689-4565.

Golden Days of Radio Players Performance, 7 p.m. June 7 at the Dietrich Theater. A live performance of favorite radio plays. Cost: free.

Jaime Jorge in concert, 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. June 12 at Clarks Green Assembly of God. The church will host the violinist during both services. Born in Communist Cuba, he will share his life story in words and his life gifts with his violin. All are invited to attend. Cost: free. Info: 570-586-8286.

Dietrich Film Favorites: ‘Mamma Mia!’ 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. June 15 at the Dietrich Theater. Cost: free.

Lakeside Wednesday Concert Series, 6 p.m. to dusk every Wednesday from June 22 through Aug. 31 at Hillside Park, South Abington Township. Schedule of bands: Exact Change, June 22; Luongo Bros Band, June 29; Coal Town Rounders, July 6; Doug Smith Band, July 13; Village Idiots, July 20; Von Storch Quartet, July 27; Music for Models, Aug. 3; Brass and Ivory Orchestra with Chris Dematio, Aug. 10; Senator John Blake and Lightweight, Aug. 17; Rogue Chimp, Aug. 24, and Sassafrass, Aug. 31. Cost: free. Info: hillsidepark.net.

Open Mic Night with Patrick Fiore, 7 p.m. June 24 at the Dietrich Theater. Doors open for sign ups at 6:30 p.m. Seating is limited. Open to audiences and performers of all ages, including musicians, poets, comedians and more. This month’s featured artist is local singer-songwriter Patrick Fiore. Cost: free.

Shakespeare in the Park: ‘A Midsummer Night’s Dream,’ 7 p.m. June 25 at Tunkhannock’s Riverside Park. Presented by Gamut Theatre Group and sponsored by the Overlook Estate Foundation. Cost: free. The show will be followed by a talk-back discussion with the audience. Attendees should bring a blanket or chair to sit on. Info: call the Dietrich Theater at 570-996-1500.

Doug Smith’s Dixieland All-Stars with Vocalist Erin Malloy, 3 to 4:30 p.m. June 26 at the Dietrich Theater. Info: 570-836-1022.

‘Les Liaisons Dangereuses’ National Theatre Live on Screen, 2 p.m. July 10 and 24 at the Dietrich Theater. Cost: $14 for general admission, $12 for member and senior tickets and $10 for child or student tickets. Group tickets, with a minimum of 10, are discounted at $10. Info/reservations: 570-996-1500.

Dietrich Film Favorites: ‘Chicago,’ 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. July 13 at the Dietrich Theater. Cost: free. Info: 570-996-1500.

Summer Fest, July 15-28 at the Dietrich Theater in Tunkhannock. Opening Night doors open at 6 p.m. Friday July 15, featuring two films, popcorn, cheese and crackers, wine, beer and dessert. Enjoy 14 foreign, independent and art films in fourteen days. Cost: $25 for opening night tickets; $8.50 for all other film festival tickets. Reservations (required for Opening Night only): 570-996-1500. Info: dietrichtheater.com.

‘Get Your Master’s with the Masters’ MFA Thesis Exhibition, July 18 through 21 at Marywood University. The university’s 2016 Master of Fine Arts in graphic design and illustration thesis exhibition features students from the “Get Your Master’s with the Masters” program in graphic design and illustration. Thesis work, study tour books, and additional projects will be on display, with an opening reception from 4 to 5:30 p.m. July 16 in the Mahady Gallery, Shields Center for Visual Arts. Cost: free. Info: marywood.edu/galleries.

Open Mic Night with Sadie Green Sales Jugband, 7 p.m. July 22 at the Dietrich Theater. Doors open for sign ups at 6:30 p.m. Open to audiences and performers of all ages, including musicians, poets, comedians and more. This month’s featured guest is the Sadie Green Sales Jugband. This duo of David Driskell and Timothy Walker will engage all ages with their rollicking jug band music. Cost: free. Info: 570-996-1500.

Summer Fest Post-Festival Discussion, 1 p.m. July 29 at the Dietrich Theater. Facilitated by Ronnie Harvey, film buff extraordinaire. Registration not required. Info: 570-996-1500.

Cornstock Folk Festival, Sept. 2 through 4 at Lazy Brook Park in Tunkhannock. Tickets for the three-day celebration of roots and acoustic music are now on sale online at cornstockfestival.com. Free camping is included with the purchase of weekend passes, which are currently available at the discounted rate of $40, through Friday, June 10. Day passes are also available for Friday, Saturday or Sunday. Info: visit Cornstock Folk Festival on Facebook.

LITERARY ARTS

Writers’ Group, 7 – 8:30 p.m. every Thursday (ongoing) at the Dietrich Theater, Tunkhannock. All genres and levels of writing are welcome. For ages 18 and up. Cost: free. Info: 570-833-5246.

Warrior Writers, 6:30-8:30 p.m. second Mondays at the Dietrich Theater in Tunkhannock. These writing workshops support artistic exploration and expression and provide a safe space to share experiences in the military culture. Open to all veterans and service members. Cost: Free. Info/register: call 570-996-1500.

‘Labor Unrest in Scranton’ Book Launch Party, 6 to 8 p.m. May 28 at the Olde Brick Theatre, 126 W. Market St., Scranton. A book launch for Margo L. Azzarelli and Marnie Azzarelli’s new title. Books will be available for purchase. Light refreshments will be served. Info: 570-346-6179, 570-209-7766 or 1877@comcast.net.

ARTS, CRAFTS AND MORE

Third Tuesday Life Drawing, 7 to 9 p.m. June 21. AFA Gallery’s Tuesday Night Drawing Group has been moved to the third Tuesday of every month. The program provides two-hour self-guided sessions with a nude model for artists of all experience levels. It also gives an opportunity for artists to improve their observational drawing skills as well as getting a better understanding of the human form. Artists are required to bring their own materials. Tables, chairs and easels are provided by a grant from the Scranton Area Foundation. Students under 18 require a parental permission slip. Cost: $2 for students, $5 for members and $7 general admission. Info: artistsforartgallery@gmail.com or 570-969-1040.

http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_ABJ-Calendars-7.jpg

Reach the Abington Journal newsroom at 570-587-1148 or news@theabingtonjournal.com.

Reach the Abington Journal newsroom at 570-587-1148 or news@theabingtonjournal.com.

Community calendar for week of May 25, 2016

First Posted: 6:35 pm - May 24th, 2016 Updated: 6:36 pm - May 24th, 2016.

Story Tools:

Social Media:

REUNIONS

Abington Heights Class of 1966 50th Anniversary High School Reunion, June 4 at the Country Club of Scranton. The event will include music by The Glass Prism. Info: call Barbara Evans at 570-357-0196.

The Abington Heights Class of 1961 55th reunion, Sept. 16-18. The weekend will include pizza in Old Forge on Friday evening, a big celebration at The Pond House in Dalton on Saturday, and a morning brunch on Sunday. Directions to The Pond House can be found at springhillsfarm.org. Info: contact Susie Hull Constantine at susan.constantine@keystone.edu or 570-209-4865 or David Specker at 716-984-0948 or jds@pdcassociates.com.

REMINDERS

Knights of Columbus Abington Council No. 6611 Bingo, at 7 p.m. every second Tuesday in the OLS Gathering Room. Cost: no cover charge; Bingo cards are 50 cents each or three for $1 per game. Complimentary light refreshments served. Wheelchair accessible. Info: call Chris Kane at 570-587-1390.

Alzheimer’s Association of Greater PA support group meetings, 7 to 8 p.m. the last Tuesday of every month at Elan Gardens, 465 Venard Road, Clarks Summit. Info: call Rhonda Fallk at 570-585-8099 or Rita Fenton at 570-586-0179.

Stroke Support Group meetings, 6 p.m. the first Wednesday of every month at Moses Taylor Hospital. For survivors of stroke and their caregivers. Cost: free. RSVP/info: call Colleen Dodgson at 570-770-5257.

The Lackawanna Historical Society’s Civil War Roundtable meetings, at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month at the Catlin House, 232 Monroe Ave., Scranton. Membership is open to anyone with an interest in the Civil War era, 1861-1865. Annual dues: $20 for individuals and $25 for families. Reservations are required. Info: 570-344-3841 or email lackawannahistory@gmail.com.

Over-eaters Anonymous meetings, 7 p.m. Tuesdays, 9:30 a.m. Thursdays, 9:45 a.m. Saturdays and 3 p.m. Sundays at First Presbyterian Church of Clarks Summit. Cost: free. Info: 570-587-4313.

Abington Lions Club used eyeglasses collection, at Abington Community Library. Collected eyeglasses will be recycled and distributed to needy people in the United States and countries abroad. A yellow container is set up in the library.

The Women of Trinity Lutheran Church’s Monthly Bible Study, 12 p.m. the first Thursday of each month at 205 W. Grove St., Clarks Summit. All are welcome to this informal bible study. Bring a brown bag lunch. Info: call Joyce at 570-222-3041 or Carole at 570-587-1088.

All You Can Eat Breakfast, 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. the third Sunday of every month at the Clarks Summit Fire Company No. 1, Inc., 321 Bedford St. Clarks Summit. Cost: $9 for adults and $6 for children 10 and under.

Lackawanna Coal Mine 2016 Tour season, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily through Nov. 30. Local residents and visitors can journey beneath the earth to catch a glimpse of the area’s rich mining history. Tours last for one hour. Cost: $10 for adults, $9.50 for senior citizens, $9 for military personnel, $8 per person for groups and $7.50 for children age three to 12. Youngsters under age 3 are admitted free. Info: 570-963-6764.

Rotary Club of the Abingtons weekly meetings, 12:10 p.m. on Thursdays at the Ramada and 6 p.m. Tuesdays at Blu Wasabi.

Project Re-Entry seeks Christmas in July donations. The Lackawanna County prison ministry is seeking donations of wrapped candy, women’s socks, toothpaste, soap, V05 or Suave shampoo (no conditioner) and monetary gifts. Items may be dropped off between July 10 and 17 at 29 New York Street, Scranton. Info: call Anna Young at 570-342-3627.

The Newton Recreation Center summer hours, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday and closed Saturdays and Sundays, May 28 through Aug. 27. The center is located at 1814 Newton Ransom Blvd, Clarks Summit.

Recovery Support Goup, 7 p.m. every Friday, starting June 3 in the Recovery Room at Clarks Green Assembly of God, 204 South Abington Road, Clarks Green. Info: 570-586-8286.

Divorce Care, 7 p.m. beginning Tuesday, June 7 at the Clarks Green Assembly of God, 204 South Abington Road, Clarks Green. Offered to those seeking help, hope, or healing. Cost: $20 for materials. Register: 570-686-8286 or cgagpa@epix.net.

DAILY EVENTS

American Red Cross blood drive, 2 to 7 p.m. May 25 at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 505 Griffin Pond Road. Appointments/info: 1-800-733-2767.

Stress Management Seminar with Geisinger Health Plans, 1 to 1:30 p.m. May 26 at the Abington Community Library. GHP Wellness will offer on-site wellness education on stress management. A representative will also be on site to offer blood pressure screenings to those interested post seminar (until 2 p.m.).

Endless Mountains Wine Fest, noon to 5 p.m. at Creekside Grove in Lenoxville. The event, hosted by Equines for Freedom, will feature local wines, food and local retailers. All funds raised will benefit the non-profit’s equine therapy program used to treat veterans with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. Tickets: $20.

Falls Lions Club’s Memorial Day Ceremony, 12 p.m. May 30 at Hock Park in Falls. Invocation by Pastor Gay Irwin. Colors by the 109th PA National Guard.

Annual Dalton Memorial Day parade and memorial service, 9 a.m. May 30 from Streamside Park to the fire hall, with services starting at about 9:20 a.m. The memorial service honoring veterans will be held rain or shine. All veterans are welcome and invited to participate. Info: call John Holbert at 563-1268.

Foster Care Educational Program with Joe Monczewski from CONCERN, 7 PM to 8 p.m. May 31 at the Abington Community Library. May is designated Foster Care Awareness Month. This informational program will review the various types of foster care, medical foster care, foster-to-adopt and adoption programs.

Abington Community Library Teen Leadership Committee meeting, 4 to 5 p.m. May 31 at the library. A group of tweens/teens in grades 5-12 focused on giving a voice to young adults for programming, book selections and more.

Second annual Kicks for Kids kickball tournament, 10 a.m. June 4 at Scranton High School’s Valor Field at Veterans Memorial Stadium. Open to teams of all ages. Benefits the United Neighborhood Centers of NEPA’s Project Hope Summer Camp at Camp St. Andrew in Tunkhannock. Teams must have a minimum of ten players. Cost: $200 per team (includes custom team shirts). Register (deadline May 20): uncnepa.org/events. Info: 570-346-0759.

37th Annual Chicken Barbecue, 12 to 6 p.m. June 4 at the Clarks Green United Church, 119 Glenburn Road. Eat in or take out chicken dinners. Cost: $10 for adults and $5 for children 12 and under.

Blood drive, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 4 at Trinity Lutheran Church, Grove Street, Clarks Summit. Walk-ins welcome.

Serving Seniors Inc.’s Annual Summer Picnic at Waldorf Park, 3 to 7 p.m. June 5 at Waldorf Park on East Mountain, Scranton. Rain or shine. Cost: $25 for adults and $12 for children under age 12. Features grilled picnic foods; hot and cold buffet; desserts; beer, wine and soda; Entertainment by EJ the DJ; a volleyball tournament and basket raffle. Proceeds benefit programs at Serving Seniors, Inc. Tickets: 570-344-3931 or servsen@epix.net.

Penn State Extension Lackawanna County Volunteer and Partner Recognition Event and Annual Meeting, 6 p.m. (5:30 p.m. registration and appetizers) June 9 at Penn State Worthington Campus Gallagher Conference Center, 120 Ridge View Drive, Dunmore. Reservations due by June 1. Info: extension.psu.edu or LackawannaExt@psu.edu.

Leadership Lackawanna’s annual Celebration of Leadership event, 5:30 p.m. June 16 at The Leonard Theater in downtown Scranton. The event includes business networking, live music, raffles, dinner stations and cocktails, a community service project showcase and the presentation of certificates to graduating participants. Cost: $50 for alumni and $65 for the general public. Reservations: 570-342-7711 or LeadershipLackawanna.com.

Boomer Benefits for Social Security and Medicare, 7 p.m. June 16 at the Dietrich Theater in Tunkhannock. Presented by Stephanie Holdt, NSSA. Cost: free. RSVP: 570-466-0679 or stephanieh@dgkinsurance.com.

Native American Mini Pow-Wow, 4 to 7 p.m. June 22 at the Abington Community Library. For all ages, featuring various performers and vendors. Program will begin at 4 p.m. and repeat at 5:30 p.m. Cost: free.

Historic Tunkhannock Comes Alive, June 25 at the Dietrich Theater and various downtown Tunkhannock locations. A history presentation will be given at 11 a.m. and the Founder’s Day Walking Tours will kick off at 12:30 p.m. Learn about Tunkhannock’s history before setting off on guided or self-guided tours of the historic district. Local historians will share stories and take questions from the audience. Free tickets for the presentation are available at the Dietrich ticket booth or by calling 570-996-1500. Preregistration is required for the free guided two-mile tours of Historic Tunkhannock, by calling 570-996-1500.

Historic Tunkhannock Walking Tours, 5 p.m. Thursdays, July 7, 14, 21 and 28. The two-mile walk through the neighborhoods and bustling downtown of the Tunkhannock Historic District will take about an hour and a half. Tour booklets, complete with thumbnail photos of forty featured structures, basic descriptions and centerfold map will be available at the Dietrich Theater during normal business hours starting June 25 for those interested in self-guided tours. Cost: free. Preregistration (required): 570-996-1500.

Close Encounters with Birds of Prey, 11 a.m. July 9 at the Dietrich Theater. Presented by Bill Streeter, Director of the Delaware Valley Raptor Center and sponsored by the Overlook Estate Foundation. See six live raptors and learn about the raptors of the Northeast. Cost: Free.

River Day, 1 to 7 p.m. July 23 at Tunkhannock’s Riverside Park. Features live music, environmental activities for children and adults, nature walks, a river float, live animals brought by the Endless Mountains Nature Center, mural painting, face painting and more. Cost: free.

BOOK SALES, AUCTIONS & VENDOR FAIRS

Countryside Conservancy’s 17th Annual Auction ‘In The Woods,’ 6 p.m. July 23 at the Waverly Country Club. Features wireless silent auction, live auction, live music, open bar and dining. Proceeds support the Trolley Trail. Reservations: 570-945-6995. Info: countrysideconservancy.org.

CHILDREN’S EVENTS

Homeschoolers at the Library, 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. May 25 at the Abington Community Library. An afternoon program to enrich your home learning experience for students in grades K-6.

Music for Littles, 10 to 10:45 a.m. May 31; June 14, 21 and 28 and July 12 at the Dietrich Theater. For ages 3 to 5. Instructor Abi Zieger will help participants explore basic musical elements through song, movement, play and an introduction to simple instruments. Parents are welcome. Sponsored by the Tunkhannock Rotary Club. Cost: free. Info: 570-996-1500.

StoryWalk, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. June 4 at Hillside Park. Tim Farrell, guest performer, will entertain people of all ages in between their walk around Lake Weston on Winola Road, where they can read aloud the book “Growing Vegetable Soup” by Lois Ehlert. The project is co-sponsored by the Abington Community Library and Abington Area Joint Recreation Board. Cost: free. In the case of rain, the event will be held at the Abington Community Library the same time and date.

All Star Players, 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. June 13 through 24 at the Dietrich Theater. For ages 13 to 18, attendees must attend all classes. Students are invited to an exciting two weeks of theater camp taught by theater professional, Brenda Fager, culminating in the performance of a full length play. Cost: Free. Info: 570-996-1500.

‘Cave Quest’ Vacation Bible School, 1 to 4:45 p.m. June 13 through 17 at Clifford United Methodist Church, Main Street, Clifford. Pre-register: cliffordumc.org. Registration also available in person at 12 p.m. June 13. Info: call Dane at 570-222-5493.

Best New Picture Book, 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. June 20 through 24 at the Dietrich Theater. For ages 5 to 7. Storytime with Rand Whipple will turn into a new story-book that parents can read to their children at home. With Whipple’s help, the class will invent, illustrate and perform a brand new picture book. Parents will get a PDF version for home and an audio version playable on their computer or smartphone. Cost: $55 for the five-day camp.

Trinity Lutheran Church Vacation Bible School, 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. June 20 to 24 at The Church of the Epiphany, Glenburn. Theme: “SURF SHACK.” Info/register: bit.ly/1rSedkS​.

Acting and Theatre Creation! 1:30 to 3 p.m. July 11 through 15 (camp one) or Aug. 1 through 5 (camp two) at the Dietrich Theater. For ages 6 to 12. Instructor: Michaela Moore. Use your imagination and learn all about acting through theatre games, improvisation, storytelling, play making, character creation and more. A casual performance for family and friends will end each week. Cost: $60 per camp. Info: 570-996-1500.

Digital Arts Camp, 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. June 27 to July 1 at the Dietrich Theater. For ages 7 – 14. Instructor: Rand Whipple of Box of Light Studios. Cost: $60.

http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_ABJ-Calendars-5.jpg

Reach the Abington Journal newsroom at 570-587-1148 or news@theabingtonjournal.com.

Reach the Abington Journal newsroom at 570-587-1148 or news@theabingtonjournal.com.

Abington Heights School Board members pass preliminary budget, cut staff through attrition

First Posted: 4:34 pm - May 24th, 2016

By Robert Tomkavage - rtomkavage@timesleader.com



Story Tools:

Social Media:

CLARKS SUMMIT — Members of the Abington Heights School Board voted, 9-0, to approve a preliminary budget of $48,171,108 with a 2.4 percent tax increase for the 2016-17 school year during a meeting May 18.

According to Abington Heights Superintendent of Schools Michael Mahon, the 2.4 percent tax increase would net the district just under $600,000.

Board members will vote to approve a final budget June 22.

Mahon added the district is planning cuts to professional staff through attrition.

“We are looking to reduce staff in the following areas: assistant superintendent, one physical education position, one library position, one teacher who taught both English and social studies, one teacher who taught both French and Spanish and two elementary school positions.

“It’s very tentative and if elementary classes go above 26 students another section would be created,” Mahon said.

Mahon is also requesting the board to approve the addition of a mathematics position at the high school.

“We are having phenomenal growth at the high school in our computer science area,” Mahon said. “It was a point of emphasis and our AP courses are full and spilling over into other sections. We want to meet this growing need, which we anticipate growing further as we focus on elementary and middle school. During this year, we want to develop another course in computer science to be offered at the start of next year.”

According to Mahon, the proposed cuts coupled with the new position would result in a savings of $690,000 toward next year’s budget.

“Even with the tax increase and cuts, there is a $2.35 million deficit,” Abington Heights Business Manager James Mirabelli said.

Junior Dagny Rippon addressed the board regarding the French 3 honors course at the high school, which is in danger of being cut due to the retirement of a teacher.

“I’ve found a passion in learning the French culture and language, and so have many of my peers,” Rippon said. “Those of us who have been recommended by our teachers and guidance counselors to take the AP French course have proven we’re ready for the challenge. My peers and I want to take this class not only because we will need its material in our future careers but also because we’re excited to further our French skills.”

According to Abington Heights Principal Pamela Murray, there are four students signed up for AP French and 10 total students in all class levels of the language.

“My recommendation, driven by the budgetary crisis we’re facing, is for the board not to fill the position and as a result there would not be an AP (French) class at the high school,” Mahon said.

Mahon announced the district’s girls lacrosse program has been accepted to join the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association (PIAA), with an official decision to be made July 1.

Wayne Stevens, Bill Riiff and Mike Naholnik inquired about starting a boys club lacrosse program, however Mahon was hesitant.

“Administration will recommend against the expansion of lacrosse to boys at this time,” Mahon said.

In other business:

•Board member Gregory Madensky was appointed as treasurer for the 2016-17 school year.

•Members of the board approved the resignation of Assistant Superintendent of Schools Thomas Quinn, effective June 30.

•Members of the board approved Andrew Snyder as Abington Heights High School principal, effective July 1.

Members of the Abington Heights School Board will hold a work session at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 1 at the Abington Heights Administration Building, 200 E. Grove St., Clarks Summit.

http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_AHHS-Sign.jpg

By Robert Tomkavage

rtomkavage@timesleader.com

Reach Robert Tomkavage at 570-704-3941 or on Twitter @rtomkavage.

Reach Robert Tomkavage at 570-704-3941 or on Twitter @rtomkavage.

Dietrich movie mania for week of May 25, 2016

First Posted: 4:30 pm - May 24th, 2016

Story Tools:

Social Media:

This week’s question: Who plays the voice of Chuck in the movie “Angry Birds?”

Last week’s answer: Jodie Foster.

Last week’s winner: Doree Rosencrance, of Clarks Summit.

http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_AJ_Dietrich_Mania_BW-Copy-4.jpg

Pieces of the Abingtons for week of May 25, 2016

First Posted: 4:29 pm - May 24th, 2016

If you know the correct location of this photo, you could win a $10 gift certificate to Lynn’s Hallmark store in Clarks Summit.
Elizabeth Baumeister | Abington Journal
Story Tools:

Social Media:

How well do you know the streets where you live? The Abington Journal puts your powers of observation to the test with our “Pieces of the Abingtons” contest. Every other week, we’ll feature a photograph of a landmark, architectural structure or other local item in public view in the Abingtons. We’ll ask you to submit a guess as to where the photo was taken and what’s featured in the photo. Then we’ll enter each correct answer in a drawing for a $10 gift certificate from Lynn’s Hallmark in Clarks Summit. We’ll notify you if you win and we’ll print the winning contestant and answer in an upcoming edition of the Abington Journal with the next contest photo.

Answer # 221: The Abington Community Library.

Winner # 221: Jacqueline Ezdebski, of Clarks Summit.

“Pieces of the Abingtons” contest rules:

1. Identify the correct location of Photo #222, shown.

2. Submit your entry by Friday, June 3, 2016.

3. Entry must include the correct location and/or description of the “Pieces of the Abingtons” featured in the current week’s photo.

4. Entry should include your name, address, contact number (not for publication) and the correct answer. Entries should be sent to: The Abington Journal, 211 S. State St., Clarks Summit, PA 18411 or news@theabingtonjournal.com

5. Contestants can only win once in a 90-day period.

http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_AJ_HallmarkLogo-1.jpg

http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_AJ_Pieces-of-Abingtons-Lynns_Hallmark_NEW-1.jpg

If you know the correct location of this photo, you could win a $10 gift certificate to Lynn’s Hallmark store in Clarks Summit.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_ABJ-Pieces-222.jpgIf you know the correct location of this photo, you could win a $10 gift certificate to Lynn’s Hallmark store in Clarks Summit. Elizabeth Baumeister | Abington Journal

Appalachian Challenge at Hillside Park raises funds for Abington area volunteers, mission trip

First Posted: 4:25 pm - May 24th, 2016

By Ben Freda - For Abington Journal



Sierra Lavelle, age 9 from Dalton, lifts a hay bale as her father Patrick Lavelle looks on during the Appalachian Challenge Saturday, May 21 at Hillside Park.
Ben Freda | For Abington Journal
Amanda Yerke, of Clarks Summit, helps her son Dylan Jones, age 3, with archery shooting as her other son Devin Jones, age 5, tries it on his own during the Appalachian Challenge Saturday, May 21 at Hillside Park.
Ben Freda | For Abington Journal
Nine-year-old Ayla Holgate, left, of Clarks Summit, climbs down the wall while Jolene Miles, of Nicholson, helps her son Kaden Miles, age 2, climb up the wall during the Appalachian Challenge Saturday, May 21 at Hillside Park.
Ben Freda | For Abington Journal
Story Tools:

Social Media:

SOUTH ABINGTON TWP. — A net crawl. A wall climb. A tire trot.

All of these events and more could be found at Hillside Park on Saturday, May 21 as part of a fundraiser for the Appalachia Service Project (ASP) called “The Appalachian Challenge.”

Other obstacles included balancing across a slack-line, archery shooting, and hammering nails on a tree stump.

Clarks Green United Methodist Church participates in the Appalachia Service Project annually by sending local volunteers aid a community in need in the Appalachia region. This year 21 volunteers from the Scranton and Abington areas will go to Logan County, West Virginia, from July 2 to 9 to repair homes for low-income families.

“A lot of the homes are old family homes that families have lived in for generations and just never updated because they don’t know how or they don’t have the resources to,” said coordinator of the Appalachian Service Project at Clarks Green United Methodist Church Sue Wittman.

Wittman’s daughter Carlie Holgate once accompanied her on a service trip in Crum, West Virginia in 1997 where they did home repair including flooring and sanding doors.

“It was a good, eye-opening experience,” Holgate said. “It was more than building decks. It was building relationships. We had a relationship with the families we helped.”

Caron Shimo and her daughter, Veronica Butler, have pitched in during the last three Appalachia Service Projects. Shimo, who helped youngsters at the archery shooting event Saturday, said she and Butler were able to see firsthand the effects of their work.

Last year, they went to St. Paul, Virginia, where they repaired a trailer for a family with three boys, ages 4, 6 and 8. They did flooring, painting, and work on the outside porch of the trailer. They became friends with the family on Facebook and were able to see photos of the finished trailer.

“With social media, we got to see the end result,” said Shimo.

This is the 21st year Clarks Summit United Methodist Church has sponsored a trip for the service project. Other local sponsors include D.G. Nicholas, Lawrence Young Funeral Home, and Flowserve.

“(The Appalachia Service Project) has benefited a lot of people in the community besides the people that we work for in Appalachia,” said Wittman. “Our kids have learned so much about serving others and helping others by doing it. Students who needed to do a service project for school chose to do the Appalachian Service Project.”

The Appalachian Challenge was held in memory of Jeanette Arnold, who brought the Appalachia Service Project to Clarks Green United Methodist Church. She was a member of the church from 1976 until her death in 2013. The church raises funds for the Appalachia Service Project throughout the year.

The children and parents enjoyed the Appalachian Challenge on Saturday.

“I think it’s a lot of fun,” said Clarks Summit resident Amanda Yerke, who brought her sons, 5-year-old Devin Jones and 3-year-old Dylan Jones, to the event.

Dalton residents Patrick and Robin Lavelle came with their 9-year-old daughter Sierra Lavelle.

“We’ve been going to the fundraisers for three years,” said Patrick. “We’re hoping Sierra, when she’s older, will go on a service project.”

The Appalachia Service Project is a national Christian ministry headquartered in Johnson City, Tennessee, but is open to people of all faiths. It sends volunteers to conduct home repairs for low-income families in Central Appalachian states, which are Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, West Virginia, and North Carolina. For more information, visit www.asphome.org.

Sierra Lavelle, age 9 from Dalton, lifts a hay bale as her father Patrick Lavelle looks on during the Appalachian Challenge Saturday, May 21 at Hillside Park.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_20160521_102228.jpgSierra Lavelle, age 9 from Dalton, lifts a hay bale as her father Patrick Lavelle looks on during the Appalachian Challenge Saturday, May 21 at Hillside Park. Ben Freda | For Abington Journal

Amanda Yerke, of Clarks Summit, helps her son Dylan Jones, age 3, with archery shooting as her other son Devin Jones, age 5, tries it on his own during the Appalachian Challenge Saturday, May 21 at Hillside Park.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_20160521_103057.jpgAmanda Yerke, of Clarks Summit, helps her son Dylan Jones, age 3, with archery shooting as her other son Devin Jones, age 5, tries it on his own during the Appalachian Challenge Saturday, May 21 at Hillside Park. Ben Freda | For Abington Journal

Nine-year-old Ayla Holgate, left, of Clarks Summit, climbs down the wall while Jolene Miles, of Nicholson, helps her son Kaden Miles, age 2, climb up the wall during the Appalachian Challenge Saturday, May 21 at Hillside Park.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_20160521_113204.jpgNine-year-old Ayla Holgate, left, of Clarks Summit, climbs down the wall while Jolene Miles, of Nicholson, helps her son Kaden Miles, age 2, climb up the wall during the Appalachian Challenge Saturday, May 21 at Hillside Park. Ben Freda | For Abington Journal

By Ben Freda

For Abington Journal

Reach the Abington Journal newsroom at 570-587-1148 or by email at news@theabingtonjournal.com.

Reach the Abington Journal newsroom at 570-587-1148 or by email at news@theabingtonjournal.com.

Elk Lake holds off Lackawanna Trail in District 2 Class A baseball playoffs

First Posted: 3:29 pm - May 24th, 2016

By Robert Tomkavage - rtomkavage@timesleader.com



Story Tools:

Social Media:

FACTORYVILLE — Lackawanna Trail faced a six-run deficit twice in the final two innings.

Both times, the Lions responded with three runs, but some early mistakes prevented them from completing a comeback.

Elk Lake scored runs in each of the first four innings and held off Lackawanna Trail, 11-8, in the quarterfinals of the District 2 Class A baseball playoffs Monday, May 23.

Center fielder Blake Chew drove in second baseman Brandon Traver, who singled to lead off the game, to give the Elk Lake a 1-0 advantage in the top of the first inning.

Elk Lake (6-9) took a 2-0 lead in the top of the second inning when Warriors designated hitter Joe McAleer walked and scored on a throwing error.

Lackawanna Trail (5-10) tied the game, 2-2, in the bottom of the inning. Shortstop Nathan Rolka walked and scored on a throwing error and second baseman Noah Coleman singled and scored on a base hit from pitcher DJ Klinges.

The Warriors scored three runs in the top of the third inning to regain the lead. Pitcher Zach Groover singled and scored on a hit from catcher Jack Waldenberger. Chew also drove in a run and scored on a wild pitch.

The Lions had a big opportunity to cut into the deficit in the bottom of the inning, but a strikeout and baserunning blunder prevented Trail from scoring any runs.

After center fielder Thomas Huffsmith grounded out to start the inning, Tyler Baltrusaitis and third baseman Nick Rolka walked and Nathan Rolka was hit by a pitch to load the bases. The next batter, catcher Thomas Vokes, stuck out and Baltrusaitis was tagged out while attempting to steal home.

“It was a big play and momentum shift for them,” Lackawanna Trail head coach Todd Peters said.

Elk Lake added to its lead in the top of the fourth on a sacrifice fly from third baseman Caleb Ely, scoring Traver who singled, stole second and advanced to third on a passed ball.

The Warriors stretched their advantage to 8-2 in the top of the sixth when Groover singled to drive in right fielder Griffin Arnold and Traver.

Lackawanna Trail mounted a rally in the bottom of the inning, sparked by a double from Nick Rolka off the glove of Chew in deep center field. Coleman walked with the bases loaded to drive in a run and scored on a wild pitch before Klinges knocked in his second run of the game on a groundout.

Elk Lake added three runs in the top of the seventh when McAleer and Traver each drove in a run and shortstop Kevin Valvano scored on a fielder’s choice.

The Lions loaded the bases to start the bottom of the inning after Huffsmith singled and Baltrusaitis and Nick Rolka were hit by a pitch. The next batter, Nathan Rolka, drove in two runs but was tagged out at first after overrunning the base. Coleman knocked in another run with a single to cut Trail’s deficit to three runs, but Lions first baseman Shawn Jones grounded into a fielder’s choice to end the game.

“They went down fighting and that was one thing we talked about going into the last inning,” Peters said. “I think they came out and showed they weren’t going to give up, but it’s hard to come back from so many mistakes in a playoff game.”

http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_baseball-1354946_960_720.jpg

By Robert Tomkavage

rtomkavage@timesleader.com

Reach Robert Tomkavage at 570-704-3941 or on Twitter @rtomkavage.

Reach Robert Tomkavage at 570-704-3941 or on Twitter @rtomkavage.

Clarks Summit resident Evan Eckersley among students who received the Contribution to Student Life Award at Lehigh University in Spring 2016

First Posted: 3:26 pm - May 24th, 2016

For Abington Journal



Story Tools:

Social Media:

BETHLEHEM — Evan Eckersley, of Clarks Summit was among the students who received the Contribution to Student Life Award at Lehigh University.

This award recognizes students who have significantly contributed to improving of the quality of student life during their time at Lehigh. Criteria includes good academic standing and specific contributions to student life through involvement in campus activities, academic initiatives, student governance, community service, leadership and their pursuits to support and empower their peers.

http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_ABJ-awards-3.jpg

For Abington Journal

Information provided by Lehigh University.

Information provided by Lehigh University.

Clark Summit student Dalton Milam presents engineering capstone project at Wilkes University

First Posted: 3:16 pm - May 24th, 2016

For Abington Journal



Story Tools:

Social Media:

WILKES-BARRE — Dalton Milam, of Clarks Summit, a mechanical engineering major, is one of 74 Wilkes University students who presented their capstone design projects for senior engineers on April 30.

All engineering seniors are required to select and execute a theoretical or experimental design or technical project. Students are required to make an oral presentation and submit a written report on the project.

Projects are built around a comprehensive, open-ended problem having a variety of acceptable solutions. Design constraints which must be addressed include economic factors, safety, reliability, ethics, societal impact and manufacturability.

The capstone design project must meet or exceed the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) Engineering Design Requirement. Milam’s capstone was a projectile targeting system — punkin chunkin machine.

http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_ABJ-research-1.jpg

For Abington Journal

Information provided by Wilkes University.

Information provided by Wilkes University.

Scranton Chapter of UNICO National hosts bingo at the Merli Center

First Posted: 2:44 pm - May 24th, 2016

Story Tools:

Social Media:

UNICO National’s April service month included the annual bingo at the Merli Center, sponsored and staffed by the members of the Scranton Chapter of UNICO National. From left, first row, Maryann Healey, Nancy Lovello, Angela Griffiths, Donna Fetsock, Eileen Sorano, Sue Murollo and Ginny Rescigno. Second row, Terry Drake, Jerry Healey, Josephine Fratamico, Danny Lovello, Linda Stefursky, Steve Andrejack, Vince Martino, Jack Trapani and Diane Giovannianni.

http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_ABJ-UNICO-Merli.jpgSubmitted photo

Dietrich Theater to screen National Theatre Live’s ‘A Streetcar Named Desire’ June 5, 19

First Posted: 2:34 pm - May 24th, 2016

For Abington Journal



National Theatre Live’s production of ‘A Streetcar Named Desire’ will be shown at 2 p.m. Sundays, June 5 and 19 at the Dietrich Theater in Tunkhannock.
Submitted artwork
Story Tools:

Social Media:

TUNKHANNOCK — A Tennessee Williams classic play is coming to the Dietrich Theater.

A National Theatre Live, Young Vic production of Tennessee Williams’ famous “A Streetcar Named Desire,” will be shown at 2 p.m. Sundays, June 5 and 19 at the theater. This is a re-imagined production in terms of the setting and characters, but loses none of the intensity of the themes that have made the play so famous.

General admission is $14, senior and member tickets are $12 and child and student admission is $10. For more information or reservations, call the Dietrich at 570-996-1500.

National Theatre Live’s production of ‘A Streetcar Named Desire’ will be shown at 2 p.m. Sundays, June 5 and 19 at the Dietrich Theater in Tunkhannock.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_ABJ-Streetcar.jpgNational Theatre Live’s production of ‘A Streetcar Named Desire’ will be shown at 2 p.m. Sundays, June 5 and 19 at the Dietrich Theater in Tunkhannock. Submitted artwork

For Abington Journal

Information provided by the Dietrich Theater.

Information provided by the Dietrich Theater.

Lakeland High School students nominated for Excellence in School Theater Arts Awards

First Posted: 2:24 pm - May 24th, 2016

Story Tools:

Social Media:

Several Lakeland High School students were nominated for awards at the Fourth Annual Excellence in School Theater Arts (ESTA) Awards Gala, to be held Monday, May 23. The Awards ceremony applauds the hard work of students from 10 high school theatre productions in NEPA. Lakeland’s production of ‘Annie’ yielded nominations for Best Overall Choreography, Best Overall Production, Best Vocal Ensemble, and Best Acting Ensemble. Lakeland’s individual nominees are, from left, Liam Osburn, Best Featured Soloist; Caleb Morgan, Best Male Lead; Corey Davis, Best Featured Villain, and Maria Merrigan, Best Featured Dancer. Absent from photo is Brooke Thomas, Best Featured Soloist.

http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_ABJ-Lakeland-ESTA.jpgSubmited photo

Four Clarks Summit residents graduate from Misericordia University

First Posted: 2:20 pm - May 24th, 2016

For Abington Journal



Story Tools:

Social Media:

DALLAS TWP. — The following Clarks Summit residents applied and were eligible to participate in Misericordia University’s spring commencement ceremony Saturday, May 21.

• Adam Candelori, Government, Law and National Security, BA

• Karen Doughty, Speech Language Pathology, MS

• Mason Moher, History, BA

• Cailey Ware, History, BA

http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_ABJ-graduations-5.jpg

For Abington Journal

Information provided by Misericordia University.

Information provided by Misericordia University.

Dietrich Theater’s May 27 Open Mic to feature music of Corky Staats

First Posted: 1:51 pm - May 24th, 2016

For Abington Journal



Montrose musician Corky Staats, who has been composing and playing for more than 30 years, is this month’s featured artist for Open Mic Night, slated for 7 p.m. Friday, May 27 at the Dietrich Theater.
Submitted photo
Story Tools:

Social Media:

TUNKHANNOCK — Open Mic at the Dietrich Theater has become an entertainment tradition in downtown Tunkhannock, held the fourth Friday of every month from April through October. Attendees can enjoy the variety of performances of those practicing and honing their talent, and then sit back and experience seasoned entertainers who are featured each month.

This month, the theater will bring back eclectic singer and musician Corky Staats for Open Mic at 7 p.m. Friday, May 27. Staats, a Montrose resident, has been composing and playing for more than 30 years. His original material reflects the sounds of Neil Young, John Prine and James Taylor.

Staats was a founding member of The Endless Mountains Trio, and now performs in a folk/blues duo with Carl Hagstrom, as well as solo performances. He has performed at many regional coffee houses, including the Cyber Café West in Binghamton; the Old Lynn Church Concert series, and regularly at area venues. He often performs at area benefits. He has one solo CD, titled, “Time Will Tell.” The Endless Mountains Trio also recently released a second CD with several of Staats’ original songs.

The free event on May 27, hosted by Angelo Maruzzelli, begins with short performances of entertainers who want to hone their craft before a live audience ,and continues with the music of experienced performer, Corky Staats. Those wishing to try out their routines or music need to sign up at 6:30 p.m.

Open Mic is always free and is sponsored by the Dietrich Fundraising Committee.

For more information, call 570-996-1500.

Montrose musician Corky Staats, who has been composing and playing for more than 30 years, is this month’s featured artist for Open Mic Night, slated for 7 p.m. Friday, May 27 at the Dietrich Theater.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/web1_ABJ-OpenMic.jpgMontrose musician Corky Staats, who has been composing and playing for more than 30 years, is this month’s featured artist for Open Mic Night, slated for 7 p.m. Friday, May 27 at the Dietrich Theater. Submitted photo

For Abington Journal

Information provided by the Dietrich Theater.

Information provided by the Dietrich Theater.