This week in local history: A place called Lynch’s hill


Compiled by Elizabeth Baumeister - ebaumeister@timesleader.com



This view of Clarks Summit in the 1890s first appeared in the Abington Journal in Sept. 1963. It is believed to be taken from a spot known in the 1890’s as ‘Lynch’s hill,’ the point where Highland Avenue drops over the hill and leads to the corner of State Street.


Abington Journal file photos

Action at an Abington Heights - Old Forge game in Sept., 1968, which Abington took, 27-7.


Abington Journal file photos

Pam Joseph, a young artist from Clarks Summit in 1976, paints eight-foot aluminum doors for the Hungarian Embassy, then under construction in Washington, D.C.


Abington Journal file photos

1966 — The Journal ran a photo from the 1890s showing a “Lynch’s hill” view of Clarks Summit.

“It is probable old timers here could identify a number of the residences,” read the 1966 Journal article. “Alden Singer, now of Chinchilla, born here of an old family and a school student in the nineties, recognized several structures from his boyhood days, enough of them to serve as keys to the present layout of the borough.”

Some of the structures identified included the old D.D. & W. Railroad station, Floyd Young’s general store, the town’s hotel, the home of a man named Dave Smith, the blacksmith shop of Tom Schilling, Clarks Summit Methodist Church, the George Vosburg farm and the home of Tom Staples.

1968 — The Abington Heights Comets beat the Old Forge Blue Devils, 27-7. Jerry Hoban, Abington Heights quarterback at the time, scored three touch down passes, clinching the team’s second win in as many Big 11 conference games.

The Lackawanna Trail Lions also roared to victory that week, with a 56-6 finish over the Archbald Rams.

“In every football game that is played, there is always a turning point where the victor takes the vantage,” read the Journal article. “Saturday afternoon on the Lackawanna Trail field, the turning point was the winning of the toss and the election to receive the ball. That toss was the last chance Archbald had in the game.”

1976 — Pamela Joseph, then an instructor at Keystone Junior College and a Clarks Summit resident, was putting the finishing touches on a five-month project of international significance: the painting of the entrance doors for the Hungarian Embassy, which was at the time under construction in Washington, D.C.

“The project, now reaching its final stages, started a year-and-a-half ago when Ms. Joseph received the commission for the work from the Scranton architectural firm of Burns and Loewe,” read the Journal article. “Her assignment, to paint the double entry doors, and combine them into a single, large outdoor work of art in brilliant sprayed lacquers, produced a large, exterior abstract, free-flowing work in brilliant earth tones of brown, orange and yellow.”

This view of Clarks Summit in the 1890s first appeared in the Abington Journal in Sept. 1963. It is believed to be taken from a spot known in the 1890’s as ‘Lynch’s hill,’ the point where Highland Avenue drops over the hill and leads to the corner of State Street.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_ABJ-LH-0923-1963.jpgThis view of Clarks Summit in the 1890s first appeared in the Abington Journal in Sept. 1963. It is believed to be taken from a spot known in the 1890’s as ‘Lynch’s hill,’ the point where Highland Avenue drops over the hill and leads to the corner of State Street. Abington Journal file photos

Action at an Abington Heights – Old Forge game in Sept., 1968, which Abington took, 27-7.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_ABJ-LH-0923-1968.jpgAction at an Abington Heights – Old Forge game in Sept., 1968, which Abington took, 27-7. Abington Journal file photos

Pam Joseph, a young artist from Clarks Summit in 1976, paints eight-foot aluminum doors for the Hungarian Embassy, then under construction in Washington, D.C.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/web1_ABJ-LH-0923-1976.jpgPam Joseph, a young artist from Clarks Summit in 1976, paints eight-foot aluminum doors for the Hungarian Embassy, then under construction in Washington, D.C. Abington Journal file photos

Compiled by Elizabeth Baumeister

ebaumeister@timesleader.com

Reach Elizabeth Baumeister at 570-704-3943 or on Twitter @AbingtonJournal

Reach Elizabeth Baumeister at 570-704-3943 or on Twitter @AbingtonJournal

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