This week in local history: A Porsche, a plant and a Presbyterian church


Compiled by Elizabeth Baumeister - ebaumeister@timesleader.com



This early sketch of the First Presbyterian Church of Nicholson ran with a Journal story commemorating the church’s 100th anniversary in October, 1965.


Abington Journal file photos

Busy workers perform their duty at the Irene Sportswear Plant No. 2 in 1962 in Dalton.


Abington Journal file photos

Pete Tunis visits the Abingtons from Hollywood, California in his 1963 Porsche in October of that same year.


Abington Journal file photos

1962 — A busy sportswear plant was amid an unsuccessful search for larger quarters in the Abingtons in order to double its capacity.

Leonard Schiavone, proprietor of Irene Sportswear Plant No. 2 in Dalton, said he was looking to lease a property that would accommodate 40 or 50 machines, at least doubling his staff of 20 operators.

1963 — Under the headline “World Traveler Visits Abingtons” ran a story about Pete Tunis, brother of Frank Tunis who paid a visit to his family in Justis, driving his green 1963 Porsche.

“I really dig the way this car takes the corners,” the adventurer told the Journal reporter at the time, as he eased the car into third gear and negotiated a hairpin curve at approximately 80 miles per hour.

“Pete is one of the few remaining of the breed who chose to seek adventure and live life to the fullest rather than security and the promise of old age benefits in an age when the latter is so prevalent among the younger generation in America today,” read the 1963 article.

1965 — The First Presbyterian Church of Nicholson celebrated its 100th anniversary with a special service on Oct. 10, 1965. The following history of the church was published on the Journal’s front page Oct. 7 of that year.

“Before the coming of the railroad, the community situated in the valley of the Tunkhannock was known as Thornbottom for the profusion of wild thorns that grew in the area. Two sects preceded the Presbyterians into this valley, the Baptists and the Congregationalists. The Baptist Church was organized as early as 1793 and the Congregational Church in 1837.

“History tells us that when the Leggett’s Gap Railroad built its first tracks through the valley, the village of Bacontown moved to the railroad and the town of Nicholson found its roots near these tracks. s in all new towns along the railroads, growth was rapid and along with the new industry came the growth of wickedness. The depot became the center of activity and Nicholson became the travel center of the area, supporting four hotels and several livery stables to provide transportation to nearby villages for the traveling men of the day.

“Worship services were held in the schoolhouses with Congregational and Presbyterian ministers providing the message. One of these ministers was the Reverend Lyman Richardson, who held revivals in Nicholson between 1850 and 1865. His last revival resulted in the organization of the present Presbyterian Church.”

This early sketch of the First Presbyterian Church of Nicholson ran with a Journal story commemorating the church’s 100th anniversary in October, 1965.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/web1_ABJ-LH-1007-1965.jpgThis early sketch of the First Presbyterian Church of Nicholson ran with a Journal story commemorating the church’s 100th anniversary in October, 1965. Abington Journal file photos

Busy workers perform their duty at the Irene Sportswear Plant No. 2 in 1962 in Dalton.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/web1_ABJ-LH-1007-1962.jpgBusy workers perform their duty at the Irene Sportswear Plant No. 2 in 1962 in Dalton. Abington Journal file photos

Pete Tunis visits the Abingtons from Hollywood, California in his 1963 Porsche in October of that same year.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/web1_ABJ-LH-1007-1963.jpgPete Tunis visits the Abingtons from Hollywood, California in his 1963 Porsche in October of that same year. Abington Journal file photos

Compiled by Elizabeth Baumeister

ebaumeister@timesleader.com

Reach Elizabeth Baumeister at 570-704-3943 or on Twitter @AbingtonJournal

Reach Elizabeth Baumeister at 570-704-3943 or on Twitter @AbingtonJournal

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