This week in local history: A tailless calf made Abington headlines in 1964


Compiled by Elizabeth Baumeister - ebaumeister@timesleader.com



A tailless calf, born in the Holstein herd of Kenneth Klipple in Milwaukie in 1964.


WWI veterans, likely just returning from Europe, march through Clarks Summit in this approximately 100-year-old photo, printed in the Abington Journal in November 1975.To the left is the Tennant Hotel and intersection of Depot and State streets, looking north on South State Street.


Members of the Baptist Bible College (now Summit University) Homecoming Court of 1985 are, from left, first row, Faith Alley, Anchorage, AK and Pilar Abadia, Bogota, Colombia. Second row, Sara Schwenk, Ft. Wayne, IN; Diana Millheim, Clarks Summit; Queen Jody Sholder, Williamsport; Christine Keiser, Williamsport; Beth Trout, Bogota Columbia; Kim Murtoff, Gardners.


1964 — A Holstein calf was born without a tail on Kenneth Klipple’s farm in Milwaukie. The Klipple farm was, at the time, in the fourth generation of family ownership. It was settled by Wenzel Klipple in the early 1800s.

“Mr. Klipple said that, after the birth, he telephoned the breeder service to ask whether they carried spare parts, and then informed them of the rare occurrence,” read a brief in the Abington Journal.

1975 — Whether in celebration of Veterans Day, for the sake of history or both, the Journal ran a photograph of a veterans parade in Clarks Summit around the time of World War I (July 28, 1914 to Nov. 11, 1918). Just barely visible in the photo is a “welcome” sign, suggesting the soldiers were just returning from Europe. The Tennant Hotel and intersection of Depot and State streets are visible at the left of the photograph, with train tracks running along the side of the street, a reminder today of just how much things can change in 100 years.

1985 — That year’s Baptist Bible College homecoming queen and attendants were announced, along with a photograph in the Abington Journal. The queen was Jody Sholder. Her attendants included Faith Alley, Pilar Abadia, Sara Schwenk, Diana Millheim, Christine Keiser, Beth Trout and Kim Murtoff.

A tailless calf, born in the Holstein herd of Kenneth Klipple in Milwaukie in 1964.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/web1_ABJ-LH-1104-1964.jpgA tailless calf, born in the Holstein herd of Kenneth Klipple in Milwaukie in 1964.

WWI veterans, likely just returning from Europe, march through Clarks Summit in this approximately 100-year-old photo, printed in the Abington Journal in November 1975.To the left is the Tennant Hotel and intersection of Depot and State streets, looking north on South State Street.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/web1_ABJ-LH-1104-1975.jpgWWI veterans, likely just returning from Europe, march through Clarks Summit in this approximately 100-year-old photo, printed in the Abington Journal in November 1975.To the left is the Tennant Hotel and intersection of Depot and State streets, looking north on South State Street.

Members of the Baptist Bible College (now Summit University) Homecoming Court of 1985 are, from left, first row, Faith Alley, Anchorage, AK and Pilar Abadia, Bogota, Colombia. Second row, Sara Schwenk, Ft. Wayne, IN; Diana Millheim, Clarks Summit; Queen Jody Sholder, Williamsport; Christine Keiser, Williamsport; Beth Trout, Bogota Columbia; Kim Murtoff, Gardners.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/web1_ABJ-LH-1104-1985.jpgMembers of the Baptist Bible College (now Summit University) Homecoming Court of 1985 are, from left, first row, Faith Alley, Anchorage, AK and Pilar Abadia, Bogota, Colombia. Second row, Sara Schwenk, Ft. Wayne, IN; Diana Millheim, Clarks Summit; Queen Jody Sholder, Williamsport; Christine Keiser, Williamsport; Beth Trout, Bogota Columbia; Kim Murtoff, Gardners.

Compiled by Elizabeth Baumeister

ebaumeister@timesleader.com

Reach Elizabeth Baumeister at 570-704-3943 or on Twitter @AbingtonJournal

Reach Elizabeth Baumeister at 570-704-3943 or on Twitter @AbingtonJournal

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