This week in local history: A tree, Tigers and a Rolls Royce in headlines from the past


Compiled by Elizabeth Baumeister - ebaumeister@timesleader.com



Suzie Pilcher, head majorette of Tunkhannock High School in 1965, does a flip for the crowd just before the Thanksgiving Day game that year.


Abington Journal file photos

Abington Heights students in 1980 get to ride in a Rolls Royce as a birthday surprise. From left, Chris Moffat, Kathy Friedmann, John Busch and chauffeur Dave Jones.


Abington Journal file photos

Girl Scouts from Junior Girl Scout Troop 41 plant a tree in 1991 in Dalton. From left, are Betty Ann Graham, co-leader; Rebecca Barkanik, Jennifer Leonard, Sarah Van Fleet, Joyce Gesek, Sarah Pherreigo, Carrie Stemrich, Kathy Dooley, co-leader; Bethany Leonard, Katie Dooley and Jamie Graaham.


Abington Journal file photos

1965 — Tunkhannock beat the Comets, 27-7, in the Thanksgiving Day football game. The Tigers’ victory evened out the rivalry at 12-12-2.

“An analysis of the game showed the Comets probably lost because Tunkhannock had more experienced men playing,” read the Journal article. “For instance, 17 seniors who played Thanksgiving Day for Tunkhannock will graduate this year while only 11 will graduate from Abington Heights High School.”

Stew Casterline was Tunkhannock’s star player at the time.

1980 — Birthday girl Chris Moffat and her friends Kathy Friedmann and John Busch, all Abington Heights students at the time, were surprised with a ride in a Rolls Royce, rented for an hour by Moffat’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Moffat.

“Although there was no ball to go to, only a pizza at Pizza Hut, Chris Moffat and her friends must have been surprised as Cinderella, when a Rolls Royce, complete with chauffeur, whisked them away from school at Abington Heights North Campus recently,” read a photo caption in the Journal.

1991 — Junior Girl Scouts of Troop 41 planted a tree in a Dalton park, naming it “Margaret” in honor of Margaret Hull, owner of Spring Hills Christmas Tree Farm in Dalton, who donated the tree.

“The girls decided to plant a tree as part of their requirements for their ‘Ready for Tomorrow’ and ‘The Sign of the Satellite’ badges, which teach them to look at the planet in different ways and to look at ways to help it,” read the Journal article.

Suzie Pilcher, head majorette of Tunkhannock High School in 1965, does a flip for the crowd just before the Thanksgiving Day game that year.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/web1_ABJ-LH-120215-1965.jpgSuzie Pilcher, head majorette of Tunkhannock High School in 1965, does a flip for the crowd just before the Thanksgiving Day game that year. Abington Journal file photos

Abington Heights students in 1980 get to ride in a Rolls Royce as a birthday surprise. From left, Chris Moffat, Kathy Friedmann, John Busch and chauffeur Dave Jones.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/web1_ABJ-LH-120215-1980.jpgAbington Heights students in 1980 get to ride in a Rolls Royce as a birthday surprise. From left, Chris Moffat, Kathy Friedmann, John Busch and chauffeur Dave Jones. Abington Journal file photos

Girl Scouts from Junior Girl Scout Troop 41 plant a tree in 1991 in Dalton. From left, are Betty Ann Graham, co-leader; Rebecca Barkanik, Jennifer Leonard, Sarah Van Fleet, Joyce Gesek, Sarah Pherreigo, Carrie Stemrich, Kathy Dooley, co-leader; Bethany Leonard, Katie Dooley and Jamie Graaham.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/web1_ABJ-LH-120215-1991.jpgGirl Scouts from Junior Girl Scout Troop 41 plant a tree in 1991 in Dalton. From left, are Betty Ann Graham, co-leader; Rebecca Barkanik, Jennifer Leonard, Sarah Van Fleet, Joyce Gesek, Sarah Pherreigo, Carrie Stemrich, Kathy Dooley, co-leader; Bethany Leonard, Katie Dooley and Jamie Graaham. Abington Journal file photos

Compiled by Elizabeth Baumeister

ebaumeister@timesleader.com

Reach Elizabeth Baumeister at 570-704-3943 or on Twitter @AbingtonJournal

Reach Elizabeth Baumeister at 570-704-3943 or on Twitter @AbingtonJournal

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