This week in local history: Memories of Clarks Summit native Grace Myers Staples retold


Compiled by Elizabeth Baumeister - ebaumeister@timesleader.com



Apache Patrol 1 of Clarks Summit races at Klondike Day at International Salto Co. in 1966. From left, Ed Noreika, Pat Ludgate, John Brady, Joe DiFalco, Mike Quinn and Joe Calvey.


Abington Journal file photos

Two Chinchilla Hose Co. men install a siren atop a service pole, about twice the height of a regular telephone pole, in 1968 on Layton Road.


Abington Journal file photos

Grace Myers Staples, born in 1880 on a farm in Clarks Summit, sits on a 100-year-old chair in 1964, telling stories of the borough’s ‘good old days.’


Abington Journal file photos

1964 — The Abington Journal ran the second piece of a two-part story highlighting the childhood memories of Clarks Summit native Grace Myers Staples, born in 1880 on the John Myers Farm at the west end of Grove Street.

“One morning, when Mrs. Staples was getting ready to leave for school, the butcher wagon arrived and Mr. Pedrick informed her that there would be no school that day because the school had been struck by lightening and had burned down,” read the 1964 article. “In those days the butcher shop was owned by Mr. Pedrick and was located where Verne Ball’s office is at present. Shopping has changed. Mrs. Stapels remembers that the butcher wagon was loaded at the butcher shop in the morning and that the wagon went from farm to farm selling fresh and smoked meats.”

While the school was being rebuilt, classes were held in churches, drug stores and wherever a group of children would fit.

“In recalling these early years of her life, Mrs. Staples described Clarks Summit as farmlands and woods for the most part,” the article continues. “There were few, if any houses, between the now Morgan Highway and the Grove St. School. She remembers that they walked through fields (by what is now Woodlawn, Midway and Atherton streets) and down over the railroad tracks and up the hill on the other side and through the woods and on to school. The only house she can recall in the central part of Clarks Summit is the George Nichols home, which is now the rectory of Our Lady of Snows Church.”

1966 — 108 Boy Scouts of the Pioneer District, Forest Lakes Council, divided into 16 patrols, participated in their fourth annual Klondike Derby at the International Salt Co. grounds.

Plenty of snow, below zero temperatures and biting winds helped simulate a trip through the Klondike District of Alaska, with a stop at each of the six “cities” in the course, where a different scouting skill was performed. The Seneca Patrol of Troop 152, Waverly, won first place, with the Eagle and Vampire patrols of Chinchilla, Troop 151 coming for a second place tie.

1968 — The Abington Journal ran a large dramatic photo on its front page, showing two Chinchilla Hose Co. men installing a fire siren atop a special service pole on Layton Road. The siren came up from the ground via a rope to the top of the pole, which was about twice the length of a regular telephone pole.

Apache Patrol 1 of Clarks Summit races at Klondike Day at International Salto Co. in 1966. From left, Ed Noreika, Pat Ludgate, John Brady, Joe DiFalco, Mike Quinn and Joe Calvey.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/web1_ABJ-LH-0203-1966.jpgApache Patrol 1 of Clarks Summit races at Klondike Day at International Salto Co. in 1966. From left, Ed Noreika, Pat Ludgate, John Brady, Joe DiFalco, Mike Quinn and Joe Calvey. Abington Journal file photos

Two Chinchilla Hose Co. men install a siren atop a service pole, about twice the height of a regular telephone pole, in 1968 on Layton Road.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/web1_ABJ-LH-0203-1968.jpgTwo Chinchilla Hose Co. men install a siren atop a service pole, about twice the height of a regular telephone pole, in 1968 on Layton Road. Abington Journal file photos

Grace Myers Staples, born in 1880 on a farm in Clarks Summit, sits on a 100-year-old chair in 1964, telling stories of the borough’s ‘good old days.’
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/web1_ABJ-LH-0203-1964.jpgGrace Myers Staples, born in 1880 on a farm in Clarks Summit, sits on a 100-year-old chair in 1964, telling stories of the borough’s ‘good old days.’ Abington Journal file photos

Compiled by Elizabeth Baumeister

ebaumeister@timesleader.com

Reach Elizabeth Baumeister at 570-704-3943 or on Twitter @AbingtonJournal.

Reach Elizabeth Baumeister at 570-704-3943 or on Twitter @AbingtonJournal.

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