This week in local history: Poetry, players and pets


Compiled by Elizabeth Baumeister - ebaumeister@civitasmedia.com



Bill Christian and Carolyn Krzan act as two suspicious characters and Jeremy Wilcox (rear) appears in the role of The Red Dragon in the Abington Players’ 1977 production of ‘The Imperial Nightingale” at the Waverly Community House.


Abington Journal file photos

When a lightning bolt struck the Newton Township home of Ralph Beck during a violent thunderstorm in 1992, firefighters responded to keep the blaze under control. Ken Mason, a former Chinchilla Hose Company emergency medical technician, revived three of Beck’s pets. Beck and his grandchildren, Natalie and Kevin, cuddle with the fortunate animals.


Abington Journal file photos

1962 – The Journal ran the following poem, titled “Today is Yours,” by Marie Hendrycy on Aug. 9, 1962.

Today is yours, O make of it a thing of beauty.

These precious hours, O, Fashion them into a song.

Spare not the smile, mix sweetness with your duty.

Earth’s time is short… eternity is long.

Today is yours, O, taste the joy of living.

Enrich your soul by helping one in need.

Forget mistakes, reach out your hands in giving.

Make this day lovely by a kindly deed.

1977 – Area actors and actresses from the Abington Players were preparing for a production of “The Imperial Nightingale” at the Waverly Community House. The Journal ran a photograph of Bill Christian and Carolyn Krzan, acting as two suspicious characters and Jeremy Wilcox, as the Red Dragon.

1981 – The latest headline from Nicholson read, “Residents sniff at odors from pet lion, sales barn.”

It was at the borough’s regular monthly council meeting that several people raised complaints about odors coming from both the Nicholson Sales Barn and a home that housed a pet lion.

The issue was referred to the borough solicitor to find out if anything could be done under existing laws, or if it would be necessary to write a more comprehensive ordinance to deal with the smelly problems.

1992 – Three family pets were rescued from a house fire that was set ablaze by a lightening bolt during a violent thunderstorm in Newton Township.

“When Ken Mason went to emergency medical technician school, he probably never thought he’d someday save the lives of anyone named Zipper, Spritz or Snowball,” began the Journal article on the incident.

The animals were the pets of Ralph and Louella Beck, who escaped the fire, but were unable to help the four-legged family members do the same.

After the fire was brought under control, the firefighters began carrying the pets out of the house, one by one, first a poodle, then a kitten. Mason used a disposable oxygen mask to help the weak and panting pets revive with some fresh air. Then when the 60 or 70 pound dog was carried out, Zipper was saved with the help of a ambu bag.

Bill Christian and Carolyn Krzan act as two suspicious characters and Jeremy Wilcox (rear) appears in the role of The Red Dragon in the Abington Players’ 1977 production of ‘The Imperial Nightingale” at the Waverly Community House.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/web1_ABJ-LH-805-1977.jpgBill Christian and Carolyn Krzan act as two suspicious characters and Jeremy Wilcox (rear) appears in the role of The Red Dragon in the Abington Players’ 1977 production of ‘The Imperial Nightingale” at the Waverly Community House. Abington Journal file photos

When a lightning bolt struck the Newton Township home of Ralph Beck during a violent thunderstorm in 1992, firefighters responded to keep the blaze under control. Ken Mason, a former Chinchilla Hose Company emergency medical technician, revived three of Beck’s pets. Beck and his grandchildren, Natalie and Kevin, cuddle with the fortunate animals.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/web1_ABJ-LH-805-1992.jpgWhen a lightning bolt struck the Newton Township home of Ralph Beck during a violent thunderstorm in 1992, firefighters responded to keep the blaze under control. Ken Mason, a former Chinchilla Hose Company emergency medical technician, revived three of Beck’s pets. Beck and his grandchildren, Natalie and Kevin, cuddle with the fortunate animals. Abington Journal file photos

Compiled by Elizabeth Baumeister

ebaumeister@civitasmedia.com

Reach Elizabeth Baumeister at 570-704-3943 or on Twitter @AbingtonJournal.

Reach Elizabeth Baumeister at 570-704-3943 or on Twitter @AbingtonJournal.

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