Clarks Summit Mayor Lawler acknowledges National Hospice and Palliative Care Awareness Month


By Elizabeth Baumeister - ebaumeister@timesleader.com



Clarks Summit Borough Mayor Patty Lawler, center, presents a proclamation for National Hospice and Palliative Care Awareness Month to Hospice Advantage representatives, from left, Susan Aulisio, RN, Clinical Service Director and Susan Meyers, Palliative Care Coordinator.


Elizabeth Baumeister | Abington Journal

Five hospice myths

Myth: Hospice means the patient will soon die.

Reality: Receiving hospice care is not equal to giving up hope and does not mean death is imminent. The earlier a patient receives hospice care, the more opportunity there is to stabilize his or her medical condition and address other needs.

Myth: Hospice care has a time limit.

Reality: Medicare and most private insurance companies pay for hospice care as long as the patient meets the criteria. Patients may come on and off hospice care and re-enroll as necessary.

Myth: Hospice is for the patient only.

Reality: In focusing on comfort, dignity and emotional support, hospice care prioritizes the quality of life for the patient, family members and care givers.

Myth: Hospice care is decided on by the physician.

Reality: The physician’s role is to recommend care, whether hospice or traditional curative, and it is the patient’s right, or the right of the person with power of attorney, to decide when hospice is needed and which program is appropriate. Before entering hospice, however, a patient must be diagnosed with a terminal prognosis by a physician and re-certified with a limited life expectancy of six months or less.

Myth: To be eligible, a patient must be bedridden.

Reality: Hospice care can be appropriate at the time of terminal prognosis and many patients served through hospice continue leading productive and rewarding lives.

CLARKS SUMMIT — The world of hospice is surrounded by myths:

Entering hospice care means one will soon die.

To become a hospice patient is equal to giving up hope.

To enter hospice care, one must already be bedridden.

Hospice Advantage, 700 S. State St., along with other providers around the country, is celebrating November as National Hospice and Palliative Care Awareness Month in an effort to dispel these and other false ideas surrounding hospice care.

“Hospice and palliative care empower people to live as fully as possible, surrounded and supported by family and loved ones, despite serious and life-limiting illness,” acknowledged Mayor Patty Lawler in a proclamation she presented to Hospice Advantage on Nov. 16. “Hospice and palliative care bring patients and family caregivers the highest quality care delivered by an interdisciplinary team of skilled professionals that includes physicians, nurses, social workers, therapists, counselors, health aides, spiritual care providers and others who make the wishes of each patient and family member a priority.”

Lawler thanked Hospice Advantage representatives Susan Aulisio, RN, clinical service director, and Susan Meyers, palliative care coordinator, for all they do in their jobs.

“I am very honored to present this to these very fine workers in healthcare,” she said. “We are honored to have them as part of the Clarks Summit Borough.”

Aulisio, who has worked in the field for 26 years, said she hopes the recognition will help people to see hospice for what it really is.

“Hospice and palliative care is a great service that is underutilized,” she said, adding that goes for hospices anywhere, not only Hospice Advantage in Clarks Summit.

Clarks Summit Borough Mayor Patty Lawler, center, presents a proclamation for National Hospice and Palliative Care Awareness Month to Hospice Advantage representatives, from left, Susan Aulisio, RN, Clinical Service Director and Susan Meyers, Palliative Care Coordinator.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/web1_ABJ-Hospice.jpgClarks Summit Borough Mayor Patty Lawler, center, presents a proclamation for National Hospice and Palliative Care Awareness Month to Hospice Advantage representatives, from left, Susan Aulisio, RN, Clinical Service Director and Susan Meyers, Palliative Care Coordinator. Elizabeth Baumeister | Abington Journal

By Elizabeth Baumeister

ebaumeister@timesleader.com

Five hospice myths

Myth: Hospice means the patient will soon die.

Reality: Receiving hospice care is not equal to giving up hope and does not mean death is imminent. The earlier a patient receives hospice care, the more opportunity there is to stabilize his or her medical condition and address other needs.

Myth: Hospice care has a time limit.

Reality: Medicare and most private insurance companies pay for hospice care as long as the patient meets the criteria. Patients may come on and off hospice care and re-enroll as necessary.

Myth: Hospice is for the patient only.

Reality: In focusing on comfort, dignity and emotional support, hospice care prioritizes the quality of life for the patient, family members and care givers.

Myth: Hospice care is decided on by the physician.

Reality: The physician’s role is to recommend care, whether hospice or traditional curative, and it is the patient’s right, or the right of the person with power of attorney, to decide when hospice is needed and which program is appropriate. Before entering hospice, however, a patient must be diagnosed with a terminal prognosis by a physician and re-certified with a limited life expectancy of six months or less.

Myth: To be eligible, a patient must be bedridden.

Reality: Hospice care can be appropriate at the time of terminal prognosis and many patients served through hospice continue leading productive and rewarding lives.

Reach Elizabeth Baumeister at 570-704-3943 or on Twitter @AbingtonJournal

Reach Elizabeth Baumeister at 570-704-3943 or on Twitter @AbingtonJournal

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