This week in local history: Top songs, recipes and thrift store were news in early 1970s


Compiled by Elizabeth Baumeister - ebaumeister@timesleader.com



Lillian Perrine, a Clarks Summit housewife, mixes her favorite spice cake to serve at an informal dessert luncheon in 1972.


Abington Journal file photos

George Osterhout stands in front of one of the well-laden shelves of his unique, non-profit enterprise, the Clarks Green Thrift Mart, in 1973.


Abington Journal file photos

1971 — The top 10 tunes on WSCR were:

1. “Knock Three Times,” Dawn

2. “My Sweet Lord — Isn’t it a Pity,” George Harrison

3. “Stoned Love,” Supremes

4. “For the Good Times,” Ray Rice

5. “One Less Bell to Answer,” Fifth Dimension

6. “No Matter What,” Badfinger

7. “Black Magic Woman,” Santana

8. “River Deep, Mountain High,” Sup0remes and Four Tops

9. “Does Anybody Know What Time It Is,” Chicago

10. “I Think I Love You,” Partridge Family

1972 — Lillian Perrine, a Clarks Summit housewife, was featured in an Abington Journal story, which described her as “generous and forthright” and “never too preoccupied by her various activities to lend a hand to a neighbor.”

Also an avid cook, the widow, mother and grandmother shared a few of her favorite recipes, one of which is the following for spice cake.

1 C. sugar

1/2 C. butter or margarine

1 C. sour milk

2 C. flour

2 eggs

1 t. baking powder

1 t. cinnamon

Dash of salt

Dash of cloves

1 small bottle maraschino cherries

1 C. walnut meats, chopped

1 t. baking soda

Small amount of hot water

Cream sugar and butter. Add eggs and mix well.

Sift dry ingredients together. Add dry ingredients and sour milk alternately, stirring well after each addition. Fold in cherries and nut meats.

Dilute baking soda in small amount of hot water and add to the mixture last.

Bake in a 9×9 inch pan for 45 minutes at 350 degrees.

1973 — Clarks Green had its own non-profit store, the Clarks Green Thrift Mart, founded by George Osterhout, of a Pennsylvania Dutch family originally hailing from Lancaster.

Osterhout couldn’t bear the sight of so many worthwhile articles being tossed into the junk heap, with so many people in need who could make use of them. So, when a building previously occupied by his church, the Abington Heights Baptist Church, was vacated after a short period of use as a youth center, her requested permission to establish a thrift exchange.

The shop sold a variety of items on consignment, with two thirds of the proceeds going to the person who brought the piece in and the rest to the church.

“Part of the charm of the Thrift Mart is derived from the fact that its layout is reminiscent of an old-time country store,” read the Journal article. “The large expanse of the church building serves as an extraordinary setting for a vast array of articles of seemingly endless diversity.”

Lillian Perrine, a Clarks Summit housewife, mixes her favorite spice cake to serve at an informal dessert luncheon in 1972.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/web1_ABJ-LH-0106-1972.jpgLillian Perrine, a Clarks Summit housewife, mixes her favorite spice cake to serve at an informal dessert luncheon in 1972. Abington Journal file photos

George Osterhout stands in front of one of the well-laden shelves of his unique, non-profit enterprise, the Clarks Green Thrift Mart, in 1973.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/web1_ABJ-LH-0106-1973.jpgGeorge Osterhout stands in front of one of the well-laden shelves of his unique, non-profit enterprise, the Clarks Green Thrift Mart, in 1973. Abington Journal file photos

Compiled by Elizabeth Baumeister

ebaumeister@timesleader.com

Reach Elizabeth Baumeister at 570-704-3943 or on Twitter @AbingtonJournal

Reach Elizabeth Baumeister at 570-704-3943 or on Twitter @AbingtonJournal

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