My Library Card: Finding friends in fiction


My Library Card - Sandy Longo



In ‘Goodbye stranger’ by Rebecca Stead, Bridge makes her way through seventh grade on Manhattan’s Upper West Side with her best friends, curvaceous Em, crusader Tab and a curious new friend, or more than friend, Sherm.


Teens and young adults may find a friend or two among these books, available to check out at the Abington Community Library.

• “Dancing with Molly” by Lena Horowitz

High school junior Becca is just a “band geek” until her friends introduce her to molly, a form of ecstasy, and she finds herself with new friends – even a boyfriend – but soon learns there is a price to her new-found popularity.

• “Emmy & Oliver” by Robin Benway

Sheltered seventeen-year-old Emmy’s childhood best friend Oliver reappears after disappearing with his father ten years ago.

• “Goodbye Stranger” by Rebecca Stead

As Bridge makes her way through seventh grade on Manhattan’s Upper West Side with her best friends, curvaceous Em, crusader Tab and a curious new friend – or more than friend – Sherm, she finds the answer she has been seeking since she barely survived an accident at age eight: “What is my purpose?”

• “Mary: Unleashed” by Hillary Monahan

Jess McAllister’s summoning obsession has turned into a deadly haunting since the ghost of Mary Worth will not rest until Jess has come undone, so now it is up to Jess and her reluctant friends, Shauna and Kitty, to stop Mary for good.

• “More Happy Than Not” by Adam Silvera

After enduring his father’s suicide, his own suicide attempt, broken friendships and more in the Bronx projects, Aaron Soto, 16, is already considering the Leteo Institute’s memory-alteration procedure when his new friendship with Thomas turns to unrequited love.

• “Not Otherwise Specified” by Hannah Moskowitz

Auditioning for a New York City performing arts high school could help Etta escape from her Nebraska all-girl school, where she is not gay enough for her former friends, not sick enough for her eating disorders group, and not thin enough for ballet, but it may also mean real friendships.

• “P.S. I Still Love You” by Jenny Han

Lara Jean didn’t expect to really fall for Peter. She and Peter were just pretending. Except suddenly they weren’t. Now Lara Jean is more confused than ever. When another boy from her past returns to her life, Lara Jean’s feelings for him return too. Can a girl be in love with two boys at once?

• “Sugar : A Novel” by Deirdre Riordan Hall

Sugar Legowski-Gracia wasn’t always fat, but fat is what she is now at age 17. Not as fat as her mama, who is so big she hasn’t gotten out of bed in months. When Sugar meets Even (not Evan; his nearly illiterate father misspelled his name on the birth certificate), she has the new experience of someone seeing her and not her body. As their unlikely friendship builds, Sugar allows herself to think about the future for the first time, a future not weighed down by her body or her mother.

• “We Can Work It Out” by Elizabeth Eulberg, Sequel to “The Lonely Hearts Club”

A follow-up to “The Lonely Hearts Club” finds Penny Lane Bloom struggling to balance the needs of a new romantic relationship with those of her club friendships, family and senior year. When Penny Lane started The Lonely Hearts Club, the goal was simple: to show that girls didn’t need to define themselves by how guys looked at them, and didn’t have to value boyfriends over everything else. Penny thought she’d be an outcast for life. But then the club became far more popular than she ever imagined it would be.

In ‘Goodbye stranger’ by Rebecca Stead, Bridge makes her way through seventh grade on Manhattan’s Upper West Side with her best friends, curvaceous Em, crusader Tab and a curious new friend, or more than friend, Sherm.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/web1_ABJ-Library-Card-0316.jpgIn ‘Goodbye stranger’ by Rebecca Stead, Bridge makes her way through seventh grade on Manhattan’s Upper West Side with her best friends, curvaceous Em, crusader Tab and a curious new friend, or more than friend, Sherm.

My Library Card

Sandy Longo

Sandy Longo is head of public services and assistant director at the Abington Community Library. Reach the Abington Journal newsroom at 570-587-1148 or news@theabingtonjournal.com.

Sandy Longo is head of public services and assistant director at the Abington Community Library. Reach the Abington Journal newsroom at 570-587-1148 or news@theabingtonjournal.com.

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