Clarks Summit Borough Council members pass ordinances at monthly meeting


By Robert Tomkavage - rtomkavage@timesleader.com



Members of Clarks Summit Borough Council approved Brian Newhart as a part-time police officer during a meeting on Wednesday, April 6. From left, Clarks Summit Mayor Patty Lawler; Albert Samuel, Brian’s grandfather; Sandra Newhart, Brian’s mother; Brian Newhart; and Clarks Summit Chief of Police Chris Yarns.


Robert Tomkavage | Abington Journal

CLARKS SUMMIT — Members of Clarks Summit Borough Council passed three ordinances during a meeting on Wednesday, April 6.

The first prohibits the use of any storage container as an accessory structure in a residential district.

Per the ordinance, an accessory structure is defined as any mobile home, box or other type trailer, any unit which was originally designed with wheels and axle(s), truck body, shipping or other container, storage unit, shed-like container, other portable structures used for the storage and/or moving of personal or business property or other similar units not originally designed as an accessory structure.

Objects that were originally designed for recreational purposes, and have not been altered, will not be considered a storage container.

Members of council passed an animal control ordinance which makes it illegal to keep fowl, defined as any wild or domestic bird including chickens, turkeys, geese, ducks, pigeons, or quail in the borough. Parakeets, parrots and other similar caged birds are not considered fowl and may be kept as pets.

The ordinance also limits the maximum number of household pets to six. Any number in excess of six and commercial breeding is now considered a kennel and subject to regulation by the borough zoning ordinance.

There is a fine of $100 for the first two violations of the ordinance. A third violation constitutes a a fine of no more than $600.

Councilman Vince Cruciani made the motion to approve the animal control ordinance with Section 502.3 removed. It states, “In the instance of urination, wash/flush the area with water.”

“I don’t believe it’s realistically enforceable,” Cruciani said.

Councilman Pat Williams objected citing safety concerns.

“It’s a health issue,” Williams said.

The third ordinance addressed height restrictions for fences and walls in the borough.

According to the ordinance, all types of chain-link fences are prohibited in front yards. Also, the ordinance limits a new front yard fence to four feet. Fences and walls up to six feet in height may be erected up to the property line of adjoining properties.

In other business:

• Brian Newhart was approved as a new-part time police officer.

• Members of borough council passed a motion to allow Chief of Police Chris Yarns to apply for a grant through the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency. The money would be used to purchase a new police car.

• Mayor Patty Lawler announced the borough will conduct a Shred Fest recycling event from 9 a.m. to noon on Saturday, April 23 at Clarks Summit Elementary School. There will be a $5 suggestion donation and all proceeds will benefit the pocket park on Depot Street.

Members of Clarks Summit Borough Council approved Brian Newhart as a part-time police officer during a meeting on Wednesday, April 6. From left, Clarks Summit Mayor Patty Lawler; Albert Samuel, Brian’s grandfather; Sandra Newhart, Brian’s mother; Brian Newhart; and Clarks Summit Chief of Police Chris Yarns.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/web1_ABJ-Clarks-Summit.jpgMembers of Clarks Summit Borough Council approved Brian Newhart as a part-time police officer during a meeting on Wednesday, April 6. From left, Clarks Summit Mayor Patty Lawler; Albert Samuel, Brian’s grandfather; Sandra Newhart, Brian’s mother; Brian Newhart; and Clarks Summit Chief of Police Chris Yarns. Robert Tomkavage | Abington Journal

By Robert Tomkavage

rtomkavage@timesleader.com

Reach Robert Tomkavage at 570-704-3941 or on Twitter @rtomkavage.

Reach Robert Tomkavage at 570-704-3941 or on Twitter @rtomkavage.

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