This Week In Local History: Elm trees, books and chocolates in past news


Compiled by Elizabeth Baumeister - ebaumeister@timesleader.com



A row of elm trees, in danger of extinction by the Dutch Elm disease, lined the Community House block in Waverly in 1966.


Abington Journal file photos

An early architectural drawing of the Dalton Community Library.


Abington Journal file photos

1966 — Community members mourned the loss of elms in Waverly, as the Dutch Elm disease attacked the trees.

“One tree which had been on the Beech Street side of the Community House was cut down two weeks ago because of the tree-crippling disease and a second one has had branches removed for the same reason,” read the Journal article.

“These developments, say tree experts, do not necessarily mean every elm in the surrounding area will have to be taken down, but they are indications of a pessimistic outlook for the future of the Waverly elms.

“The leafy landmarks on the village square have been there about 50 years and contribute to the small town charm as well as being real estate assets. There are about 18 elms on the Community House property but already the Dutch elm disease has been spotted in several surrounding residential areas.”

1978 — A $50,000 fund drive was launched in Dalton for the building of a new library.

The drive kicked off with a breakfast held at the Dalton United Methodist Church and the campaign was set to continue through the remainder of the month.

“Scores of volunteer workers assigned on 36 teams were asked for an all-out effort by Sid Benjamin, general chairman,” read the front page story in the Journal. “He said that the drive is a rarity in an area when there is so much dependence on state and federal grants, in that ‘something which is so badly needed by our community will be paid for by the people of Dalton on their own.’

“Another unusual aspect of the campaign is the start of construction before the drive started. Good progress is being made on the handsome structure, which will include reading areas and a community meeting room, according to the architects, Leung, Hemmler and Camayd.”

1991 — Gertrude Hawk Chocolates opened its 15th retail store in Clarks Summit.

The Dunmore-based confectioner’s move into Summit Square marked its third new shop within that year.

“We’d like to think that our Clarks Summit store will offer customers the solution to the question, ‘Where can I go to find the perfect gift?’” Retail Sales Manager Tom Healey told the Journal at the time.

A row of elm trees, in danger of extinction by the Dutch Elm disease, lined the Community House block in Waverly in 1966.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/web1_ABJ-LH-0921-1966.jpgA row of elm trees, in danger of extinction by the Dutch Elm disease, lined the Community House block in Waverly in 1966. Abington Journal file photos

An early architectural drawing of the Dalton Community Library.
http://theabingtonjournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/web1_ABJ-LH-0921-1978.jpgAn early architectural drawing of the Dalton Community Library. Abington Journal file photos

Compiled by Elizabeth Baumeister

ebaumeister@timesleader.com

Reach Elizabeth Baumeister at 570-704-3943 or on Twitter @AbingtonJournal.

Reach Elizabeth Baumeister at 570-704-3943 or on Twitter @AbingtonJournal.

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